Oxygen factoids – what you need to know

As part of our commitment to sharing our knowledge and expertise of gas detection safety around the world, we have created a series of short and to-the-point “factoid” videos, covering a variety of gas-related hazards. As with all our videos, they are intended to be watched, downloaded and/or shared however helps you. Please use them to spread the word and improve gas detection safety.

This first video focuses on risks associated with either too little or too much oxygen (O2).

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Carbon Dioxide – Friend and Foe?

Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas is commonly used in the manufacture of popular beverages. The leak at the Greene King brewery in Bury St Edmunds (UK) last week, is a reminder of the importance of effective gas detection. It resulted in twenty workers having to be rescued by emergency services and local residents being evacuated. So what is carbon dioxide, why is it dangerous and why do we have to monitor it carefully?

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Area monitoring – don’t be taken by suprise!


Outdoor leaks from storage tanks or pipelines are a particular kind of hazard. Many outdoor areas won’t have permanent, fixed detection. If you rely on your personal monitor, by the time it alarms, you could be engulfed in a hazardous gas cloud. A temporary early warning system between you and the potential source of a gas hazard can alert you to trouble coming your way.

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15 volcanoes. 6 Scientists. 1 Land Rover. 6 Gas Detectors.

When I was contacted by one of our sister companies’ requesting support for a research team, I was immediately struck by the extreme nature of the ‘Trail by Fire’ project. A small team of roving volcanologists is aiming to provide the first accurate and large-scale estimate of the flux of a number of volatile gas species. Keeping this team safe in their work became a priority and I am proud to announce that Crowcon is supporting this young group of researchers working along the Nazca subduction zone in South America. Continue reading “15 volcanoes. 6 Scientists. 1 Land Rover. 6 Gas Detectors.”

Accurate monitoring of exposure to toxic gases using TWA

Unique to T4, the TWA Resume function ensures toxic gas exposure is calculated accurately over an entire shift, even if T4 is switched off for a break or during travel to another site.

When most portable detectors are turned off, the algorithm that assesses TWA exposure assumes that it’s the end of the shift. When turned on again, these detectors act as if it is a new work shift, ignoring all previous measurements. The TWA Resume function however, provides the option to include previous measurements from within the correct time frame.