Have you ever thought about the dangers behind your favourite beverage?

It’s only natural for us to associate the need for gas detection in the oil and gas, and steel industries, but have you thought about the need to detect hazardous gases such as carbon dioxide and nitrogen in the brewing and beverage industry?

Maybe it’s because nitrogen (N2) and carbon dioxide (CO2) are naturally present in the atmosphere. It could be that CO2 is still under-valued as a hazardous gas. Although in the atmosphere CO2 remains at very low concentrations – around 400 parts per million (ppm), greater care is needed in brewery and cellar environments where in confined spaces, the risk of gas canisters or associated equipment leaking could lead to elevated levels. As little as 0.5% volume (5000ppm) of CO2 is a toxic health hazard. Nitrogen on the other hand, can displace oxygen.

CO2 is colourless, odourless and has a density which is heavier than air, meaning pockets of CO2 gather low on the ground gradually increasing in size. CO2 is generated in huge amounts during fermentation and can pose a risk in confined spaces such as vats, cellars or cylinder storage areas, this can be fatal to workers in the surrounding environment, therefore Health & Safety managers must ensure the correct equipment and detectors are in place.

Brewers often use nitrogen in multiple phases of the brewing and dispensing process to put bubbles into beer, particularly stouts, pale ales and porters, it also ensures the beer doesn’t oxidise or pollute the next batch with harsh flavours. Nitrogen helps push the liquid from one tank to another, as well as offer the potential to be injected into kegs or barrels, pressurising them ready for storage and shipment. This gas is not toxic, but does displace oxygen in the atmosphere, which can be a danger if there is a gas leak which is why accurate gas detection is critical.

Gas detection can be provided in the form of both fixed and portable. Installation of a fixed gas detector can benefit a larger space such as plant rooms to provide continuous area and staff protection 24 hours a day. However, for worker safety in and around cylinder storage area and in spaces designated as a confined space, a portable detector can be more suited. This is especially true for pubs and beverage dispensing outlets for the safety of workers and those who are unfamiliar in the environment such as delivery drivers, sales teams or equipment technicians. The portable unit can easily be clipped to belts or clothing and will detect pockets of CO2 using alarms and visual signals, indicating that the user should immediately vacate the area.

At Crowcon, we’re dedicated in growing a safer, cleaner, healthier future for everyone, every day by providing best in class gas safety solutions. It’s vital that once gas detectors are deployed, employees should not get complacent, and should be making the necessary checks an essential part of each working day as early detection can be the difference between life and death.

Quick facts and tips about gas detection in breweries:

  • Nitrogen and CO2 are both colourless and odourless. CO2 being 5 times heavier than air, making it a silent and deadly gas.
  • Anyone entering a tank or other confined space must be equipped with a suitable gas detector.
  • Early detection can be the difference between life and death.

Working together for safety at sea

Crowcon Detection Instruments is working together with Solent University’s Warsash School of Maritime Science and Engineering – all in the name of teaching engineering cadets, senior Merchant Navy officers, and Superyacht crews.

Solent delivers world-renowned yacht and powerboat design degree programmes, a suite of international maritime studies courses and a wide range of specialist support services for the maritime industry. It is also conducting a large number of research studies that make a real impact on industry thought leadership.

Their partnership with Crowcon makes good sense!  The marine environment is a dangerous one – and not just the more obvious hazards like high seas, storms, or rocks and coral reefs.  Confined spaces on ships, high-risk cargo, and on-ship processes all present potential gas hazards.

To keep mariners safe, gas monitoring equipment is essential.  Gas detection equipment requires specific marine environment testing and certification to ensure suitability to the extreme environments it operates in.  The European Marine Equipment Directive (MED) approval is internationally recognised. Gas detectors used by mariners onboard a vessel registered in an EU country must hold MED approval, and show the wheel mark to demonstrate compliance.

Crowcon has provided the university with demonstration T4 portable multi gas detectors.  T4 provides effective protection against the four most common gas hazards experienced in the marine industry, and is robust and tough enough to deal with the demanding marine environments.  T4 is ideally suited to help vessels comply with multiple SOLAS requirements which dictate the need for gas detection onboard vessels.

John Gouch, lecturer at  Solent University, said: “I have used Crowcon instruments in industry for many years, and know how reliable and trustworthy their gas detectors are. Since joining Warsash 18 months ago, I have been keen to ensure students understand the important part gas detection plays within the on-board safety system.”

“By using demo units of these detectors within our marine engineering courses, we can show the importance of gas detection in a marine environment to hundreds of seafarers and mariners, keeping as many people as possible aware and safe.”

Louise Early, Head of Marketing at Crowcon, said: “We’re really pleased with our partnership with Solent University.  By developing our relationship with training establishments, our safety message gets out to the people who will benefit most. We are always keen to learn from industry and this programme also offers Crowcon further insight into the way in which our equipment is used.”

For more information, visit the Solent University website, or the marine section of our industries page.

Tori’s time at Crowcon

We introduced Tori, the Halma Graduate working with our marketing team, in a previous post.

After completing projects in operations at Diba Industries Inc. in Danbury, CT, USA, and product management at FFE Ltd. in Hitchin, UK, Tori chose to come to Crowcon for her marketing placement. Below, Tori describes why she made that choice and the experiences she has had while working here.

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Deadly Sin No. 6 – ignoring alarms

Ignoring alarms is Crowcon’s sixth in the series of Deadly Sins of Gas Detection. Alarms may be ignored if they go off so frequently that they become a source of annoyance rather than a vital piece of safety equipment. However, there have been incidents when a history of such spurious alarms has led to the detector being ignored or switched off, with disastrous results.

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Investors in People Celebration

On Friday 4th Dec we celebrated our recent achievement of the Investors in People accreditation with a tea party for all staff at our UK Headquarters. Waiter service was provided by the Directors and Senior Management Team, in recognition of the contribution of all employees to achieving the standard.

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Crowcon recognised at the Educational Partnership Award

Last night we were excited to be finalists for the Educational Partnership Award at the inaugural Engineering Manufacturing and Innovation Awards by Cotswold Life Business & Professional magazine…emiawards.cotswoldlife.co.uk

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Training – the vital ingredient

Gas detection is a critical safety function in many industries, to protect people from harm and avoid costly plant disruption or damage. Not only must you use a suitable instrument for the task and the environment, but it must be used correctly and maintained properly if it is to fully serve its purpose.

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