Our Partnership with Tyco (Johnson Controls)

Background 

Johnson Controls has over 120 years’ experience in providing complete life safety to the oil and gas industries world-wide helping to provide 90% of the world’s top fifty oil and gas companies. Merging with Tyco in 2018 they now provide a full turn-key solution for the global marine and navy industries. The merge has allowed for the protection of over 80% of the vessels at sea for all types of assets and facilities including fixed and portable devices. Johnson Controls also supply gas detection to the renewable industry.

Views on Gas Detection 

Johnson Controls is uniquely positioned to offer comprehensive and integrated solutions for a wide range of proven products and systems across several industries and applications. Johnson Controls have a culture that focuses on innovation and continuous improvement which in turn helps to us to solve current challenges whilst constantly looking to ‘What’s next’. As gas detection is an essential instrument for many workers within the oil and gas and marine industries, providing honestly and transparency is key as well as upholding the highest standards of integrity and honour in the commitments they make, ensure that their customers are given a solution that not only solves their pain but also protects their workers.  

Working with Crowcon 

Through continuous communication, our partnership with Johnson Controls has allowed them to provide honesty and transparency to their customers. This partnership has allowed Johnson Controls to reach a variety of industries and applications. Although previously our partnership has predominately been focused on our portable product range, future hopes will be focussed on our fixed product range, of which will allow Johnson Controls to expand their customer base as well as providing a solution to a wider audience. “Our partnership with Crowcon has allowed us to offer a solution to all customers, ensuring that those who we supply equipment to are protected.”  

Understanding Air Pollutants: A Guide to Ozone (O3)

What is Ozone (O3)

Ozone (O3 ) is a highly reactive gas composed of three oxygen atoms. It is both a natural and a man-made product that occurs in both the Earth’s upper (stratosphere), and lower (troposphere) atmosphere. Depending on where it is in the atmosphere, ozone can affect life on Earth in both beneficial and non-beneficial ways. Many people will be familiar with the ozone layer which is naturally occurring in the upper atmosphere and forms a protective layer from the suns rays. The less widely known form of ozone (sometimes referred to as tropospheric ozone) occurs in the lower atmosphere and is one of the most common pollutants impacting the quality of our air.

Sources

In contrast to many air pollutants, almost no ozone is directly caused by human activity. Instead, the ozone is formed in the air where high concentrations of energy interact with oxygen molecules. This can be high energy photons from the sun interacting high up in Earths stratosphere, or lightning in Earth’s lower atmosphere, or from reactions between other pollutants in sunlight. Tropospheric ozone is formed where concentrations of those pollutants are greatest, as sunlight causes reactions between nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) – often near cities and industrial areas. Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) are generated in a variety of ways, and are often associated with the oil refining and petrochemical industries, whilst nitrogen oxides (NOx) originate from the combustion of fossil fuels in stationary sources, such as heating and power generation, as well as in motor vehicles.

Environmental Impact

Ozone itself is a greenhouse gas. As such, increasing concentrations of ground-level ozone contributes directly to global warming, and is significant as one of the pollutants causing the increase in the overall average temperature of earth’s atmosphere. Ozone is also generally an ingredient in the ‘smog’ which forms over large cities.

Tropospheric ozone has a significant impact on ecosystems, wildlife and plants. It can cause plants, trees and crops to suffer from slowed growth rate and has the potential to cause mass die-off in crops. Tropospheric ozone pollution is often seen to be an urban issue as it is in these areas where it is primarily formed. However, ozone also finds its way to more rural areas, potentially being carried hundreds of miles by wind or forming as a result of other sources of air pollution in these areas.

Health Impact

High levels of ozone gas can cause irritation and inflammation of the lungs, as well as irritate the eyes, nose and throat which can lead to persistent coughing and chest discomfort. This is of particular concern for asthmatic individuals, as ozone pollution episodes can increase breathing difficulties. Studies across Europe, Asia and North America have repeatedly found that risk of premature death increases with higher levels of ozone pollution.

Depending on level of exposure, ozone can cause coughing and sore throats, inflame and damage airways, aggravate existing conditions such as asthma and make the lungs more susceptible to infection.

Sensit by Crowcon RAMP

The Sensit RAMP is a robust, remote and reliable low-cost air quality monitoring platform. The device is capable of monitoring up to five gaseous chemical pollutants. The device uses a laser scattering detection method to detect both PM2.5 and PM10 with a range of 1-1000 μg/m3.

The RAMP is suitable for use in a variety of industries including construction, transport, waste, oil and gas, chemical and petrochemical industries.

What causes Hydrocarbon Fires?  

Hydrocarbon fires are caused by fuels containing carbon being burned in oxygen or air. Most fuels contain significant levels of carbon, including paper, petrol, and methane – as examples of solid, liquid or gaseous fuels – hence hydrocarbon fires. 

For there to be an explosion risk there needs to be at least 4.4% methane in air or 1.7% propane, but for solvents as little as 0.8 to 1.0% of the air being displaced can be enough to create a fuel air mix that will explode violently on contact with any spark.

Dangers associated with hydrocarbon fires

Hydrocarbon fires are considered highly dangerous when compared to fires that have ignited as a result of simple combustibles, as these fires have the capacity to burn at a larger scale as well as also having the potential to trigger an explosion if the fluids released cannot be controlled or contained. Therefore, these fires pose a dangerous threat to anyone who works in a high-risk area, the dangers include energy related dangers such as burning, incineration of surrounding objects. This is a danger due to the ability that the fires can grow quickly, and that heat can be conducted, converted and radiated to new sources of fuel causing secondary fires. 

Toxic hazards may be present in combustion products, for example, carbon monoxide (CO), hydrogen cyanide (HCN), hydrochloric acid (HCL), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and various polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) compounds are dangerous for those working in these environments. CO uses the oxygen that is used to transport the red blood cells around the body, at least temporarily, impairing the body’s ability to transport oxygen from our lungs to the cells that need it. HCN adds to this problem by inhibiting the enzyme that tells the red blood cells to let go of the oxygen they have where it is needed – further inhibiting the body’s ability to get the oxygen to the cells that need it. HCL is a generally an acidic compound that is created through overheated cables. This is harmful to the body if ingested as it affects the lining of the mouth, nose, throat, airways, eyes, and lungs. NO2 is created in high temperature combustion and that can cause damage to the human respiratory tract and increase a person’s vulnerability to and in some cases lead to asthma attacks. PAH’s affects the body over a longer period of time, with serve cases leading to cancers and other illnesses. 

We can look up the relevant health levels accepted as workplace safety limits for healthy workers within Europe and the permissible exposure limits for the United States. This gives us a 15-minute time weighted average concentration and an 8-hour time weighted average concentration. 

For the gases these are: 

Gas  STEL (15-minute TWA)  LTEL (8-hour TWA)  LTEL (8hr TWA) 
CO  100ppm  20ppm  50ppm 
NO2  1ppm  0.5ppm  5 Ceiling Limit 
HCL  1ppm  5ppm  5 Ceiling Limit 
HCN  0.9ppm  4.5ppm  10ppm 

The different concentrations represent the different gas risks, with lower numbers needed for more dangerous situations. Fortunately, the EU has worked it all out for us and turned it into their EH40 standard. 

Ways of protecting ourselves

We can take steps to ensure we do not suffer from exposure to fires or their unwanted combustion products. Firstly of course, we can adhere to all fire safety measures, as is the law. Secondly, we can take a pro-active approach and not let potential fuel sources accumulate. Lastly, we can detect and warn of the presence of combustion products using appropriate gas detection equipment. 

Crowcon product solutions

Crowcon provides a range of equipment capable of detecting fuels and the combustion products described above. Our PID products detect solids and liquid-based fuels once they are airborne, as either hydrocarbons on dust particles or solvent vapours. This equipment includes our GasPro portable. The gases can be detected by our Gasman single gas, T3 multi gas and Gas-Pro multi gas pumped portable products, and our Xgard, Xgard Bright and Xgard IQ fixed products – each of which has the capability of detecting all the gases mentioned. 

The importance of Gas Detection in the Waste to Energy industry 

Waste is composed of materials that are no longer needed, and thus are discarded. Waste can be classified as solid or liquid according to its form, and further categorised as hazardous and non-hazardous waste. Liquid waste includes municipal wastewater, storm water run-off and industrial wastewater discharge. 

Solid waste includes household rubbish, which is also called municipal solid waste (MSW), industrial waste – for example, from agriculture – medical and electronics waste. 

The treatment of solid waste is challenging because it may contain one of more contaminants (which may include heavy metals, explosive and flammable materials) and these must be dealt with before the waste can be treated. 

What are the gas hazards? 

There are many processes to turn waste into energy, these include, biogas plants, refuse collection, leachate pool, combustion and heat recovery, exhaust air scrubber and ash pit. All these processes pose gas hazards to those working in these environments.  

Within a Biogas Plant, biogas is produced. This is formed when organic materials such as agricultural and food waste are broken down by bacteria in an oxygen-deficient environment. This is a process called anaerobic digestion. When the biogas has been captured, it can be used to produce heat and electricity for engines, microturbines and fuel cells. Clearly, biogas has high methane content as well as substantial H2S (Hydrogen Sulphide), and this generates multiple serious gas hazards. (Read our blog for more information on biogas). However, there is an elevated risk of, fire and explosion, confined space hazards, asphyxiation, Oxygen depletion and gas poisoning (H2S, NH3). Workers in a biogas plant must have personal gas detectors that detect and monitor flammable gas, oxygen and toxic gases like H2S and CO. 

Within a refuse collection it is common to find flammable gas CH4 and toxic gases H2S, CO and NH3. This is because refuse bunkers are built several metres underground and gas detectors are usually mounted high above them, this makes those detectors hard to service and calibrate. In many cases, a sampling system is a practical solution as air samples can be brought to a convenient location and measured. 

Leachate is a liquid that drains (leaches) from an area in which waste is collected, with leachate pools presenting a range of gas hazards. These include the risk of flammable gas (explosion risk), H2S (poison, corrosion), ammonia (poison, corrosion), CO (poison) and adverse oxygen levels (suffocation). Leachate pool and passageways leading to the leachate pool requiring monitoring of CH4 (Methane), H2S, CO, NH3 (Ammonia), O2 and CO2. Various gas detectors should be placed along routes to the leachate pool, with output connected to external control panels. 

Combustion and heat recovery requires the detection of O2 and toxic gases SO2 (Sulphur dioxide) and CO. These gases all pose a threat to those who work in boiler house areas. 

Another process that is classed as a gas hazard is an exhaust air scrubber. The process is hazardous as the flue gas from incineration is highly toxic. This is because it contains pollutants such as NO2, SO2, HCl and dioxin. NO2 (Nitrogen dioxide) and SO2 are major greenhouse gases, while HCL and dioxides are harmful to human health 

Additionally, ash pits contain toxic gases as well as oxygen monitoring, through both O2 and CO.  

To read more on the waste to energy industry, visit our industry page.  

How do Electrochemical sensors work? 

Electrochemical sensors are the most used in diffusion mode in which gas in the ambient environment enters through a hole in the face of the cell. Some instruments use a pump to supply air or gas samples to the sensor. A PTFE membrane is fitted over the hole to prevent water or oils from entering the cell. Sensor ranges and sensitivities can be varied in design by using different size holes. Larger holes provide higher sensitivity and resolution, whereas smaller holes reduce sensitivity and resolution but increase the range.  

Benefits  

Electrochemical sensors have several benefits.  

  • Can be specific to a particular gas or vapor in the parts-per-million range. However, the degree of selectivity depends on the type of sensor, the target gas and the concentration of gas the sensor is designed to detect.  
  • High repeatability and accuracy rate. Once calibrated to a known concentration, the sensor will provide an accurate reading to a target gas that is repeatable. 
  • Not susceptible to poisoning by other gases, with the presence of other ambient vapours will not shorten or curtail the life of the sensor. 
  • Less expensive than most other gas detection technologies, such as IR or PID technologies. Electrochemical sensors are also more economical. 

Issues with cross-sensitivity  

Cross-sensitivity occurs when a gas other than the gas being monitored/detected can affect the reading given by an electrochemical sensor. This causes the electrode within the sensor to react even if the target gas is not actually present, or it causes an otherwise inaccurate reading and/or alarm for that gas. Cross-sensitivity may cause several types of inaccurate reading in electrochemical gas detectors. These can be positive (indicating the presence of a gas even though it is not actually there or indicating a level of that gas above its true value), negative (a reduced response to the target gas, suggesting that it is absent when it is present, or a reading that suggests there is a lower concentration of the target gas than there is), or the interfering gas can cause inhibition. 

Factors affecting electrochemical sensor life  

There are three main factors that affect the sensor life including temperature, exposure to extremely high gas concentrations and humidity. Other factors include sensor electrodes and extreme vibration and mechanical shocks. 

Temperature extremes can affect sensor life. The manufacturer will state an operating temperature range for the instrument: typically -30˚C to +50˚C. High quality sensors will, however, be able to withstand temporary excursions beyond these limits. Short (1-2 hours) exposure to 60-65˚C for H2S or CO sensors (for example) is acceptable, but repeated incidents will result in evaporation of the electrolyte and shifts in the baseline (zero) reading and slower response.  

Exposure to extremely high gas concentrations can also compromise sensor performance. Electrochemical sensors are typically tested by exposure to as much as ten-times their design limit. Sensors constructed using high quality catalyst material should be able to withstand such exposures without changes to chemistry or long-term performance loss. Sensors with lower catalyst loading may suffer damage. 

The most considerable influence on sensor life is humidity. The ideal environmental condition for electrochemical sensors is 20˚Celsius and 60% RH (relative humidity). When the ambient humidity increases beyond 60%RH water will be absorbed into the electrolyte causing dilution. In extreme cases the liquid content can increase by 2-3 times, potentially resulting in leakage from the sensor body, and then through the pins. Below 60%RH water in the electrolyte will begin to de-hydrate. The response time may be significantly extended as the electrolyte or dehydrated. Sensor electrodes can in unusual conditions be poisoned by interfering gases that adsorb onto the catalyst or react with it creating by-products which inhibit the catalyst. 

Extreme vibration and mechanical shocks can also harm sensors by fracturing the welds that bond the platinum electrodes, connecting strips (or wires in some sensors) and pins together. 

‘Normal’ life expectancy of electrochemical Sensor  

Electrochemical sensors for common gases such as carbon monoxide or hydrogen sulphide have an operational life typically stated at 2-3 years. More exotic gas sensor such as hydrogen fluoride may have a life of only 12-18 months. In ideal conditions (stable temperature and humidity in the region of 20˚C and 60%RH) with no incidence of contaminants, electrochemical sensors have been known to operate more than 4000 days (11 years). Periodic exposure to the target gas does not limit the life of these tiny fuel cells: high quality sensors have a large amount of catalyst material and robust conductors which do not become depleted by the reaction. 

Products  

As electrochemical sensors are more economical, We have a range of portable products and fixed products that use this type of sensor to detect gases.  

To explore more, visit our technical page for more information. 

What is a Pellistor (Catalytic Beads)? 

Pellistor sensors consist of two matched wire coils, each embedded in a ceramic bead. Current is passed through the coils, heating the beads to approximately 230˚C. The bead becomes hot from the combustion, resulting in a temperature difference between this active and the other ‘reference’ bead.  This causes a difference in resistance, which is measured; the amount of gas present is directly proportional to the resistance change, so gas concentration as a percentage of its lower explosive limit (% LEL*) can be accurately determined. Flammable gas burns on the bead and the additional heat generated produces an increase in coil resistance which is measured by the instrument to indicate gas concentration. Pellistor sensors are widely used throughout industry including on oil rigs, at refineries, and for underground construction purposes such as mines, and tunnels. 

Benefits of Pellistor Sensors?

Pellistor sensors are relatively low in cost due to differences in the level of technology in comparison to the more complex technologies like IR sensors, however, they may be required to be replaced more frequently. With a linear output corresponding to the gas concentration, correction factors can be used to calculate the approximate response of pellistors to other flammable gases, which can make pellistors a good choice when there are multiple flammable gases and vapours present. 

Factors affecting Pellistor Sensor Life

The two main factors that shorten the sensor life include exposure to high gas concentration and poisoning or inhibition of the sensor. Extreme mechanical shock or vibration can also affect the sensor life.  

The capacity of the catalyst surface to oxidise the gas reduces when it has been poisoned or inhibited. Sensor lifetimes of up to ten years is known in some applications where inhibiting or poisoning compounds are not present. Higher power pellistors have larger beads, hence more catalyst, and that greater catalytic activity ensures less vulnerability to poisoning. More porous beads allow easier access of the gas to more catalyst allowing greater catalytic activity from a surface volume instead of just a surface area. Skilled initial design and sophisticated manufacturing processes ensure maximum bead porosity. 

Strength of the bead is also of great importance since exposure to high gas concentrations (>100% LEL) may compromise sensor integrity causing cracking. Performance is affected and often offsets in the zero/base-line signal result. Incomplete combustion results in carbon deposits on the bead: the carbon ‘grows’ in the pores and causes mechanical damage or just gets in the way of gas reaching the pellistor. The carbon may however be burned off over time to re-reveal catalytic sites.  

Extreme mechanical shock or vibration can in rare cases cause a break in the pellistor coils. This issue is more prevalent on portable rather than fixed-point gas detectors as they are more likely to be dropped, and the pellistors used are lower power (to maximise battery life) and thus use more delicate thinner wire coils. 

What happens when a Pellistor is poisoned? 

A poisoned pellistor remains electrically operational but may fail to respond to gas as it will not produce an output when exposed to flammable gas. This means a detector would not go into alarm, giving the impression that the environment is safe.  

Compounds containing silicon, lead, sulphur, and phosphates at just a few parts per million (ppm) can impair pellistor performance.  Therefore, whether it’s something in your general working environment, or something as harmless as cleaning equipment or hand cream, bringing it near to a pellistor could mean you are compromising your sensor’s effectiveness without even realising it. 

Why are silicones bad? 

Silicones have their virtues, but they may be more common than you first thought. Some examples include sealants, adhesives, lubricants, and thermal and electrical insulation. Silicones, have the ability to poison a sensor on a pellistor at extremely low levels, because they act cumulatively a bit at a time.  

Products  

Our portable products all use low power portables pellistor beads. This prolongs battery life but can make them prone to poisoning. Which is why we offer alternatives that do not poison, such as the IR and MPS sensors. Our fixed products use a porous high energy fixed pellistor. 

To explore more, visit our technical page for more information.

 Our Partnership with Point Safety 

Background

Point safety Ltd is one of the UK’s leading gas safety consultants with 20 years of experience, knowledge and background in the instrumentation industry. Founded in 2011, it specialises in sectors such as oil and gas, pharmaceutical, utilities and telecommunication, providing a range of industries, supplying, installing and maintaining bespoke solutions and the service and supply of test equipment. Point Safety provide constancy to their customers as they believe that there is no such thing as ‘one size fits all’ nor does one solution have to be ‘fit for purpose.

Views on Gas Detection

Portable gas detection is an essential piece of equipment when detecting toxic or explosive gasses and measuring gas concentration. Point Safety puts customers at the forefront of gas detection; they believe that it protects their customers’ plants and processes and, more importantly, helps prevent injury, thereby helping to ensure the health, safety, and wellbeing of its workers. 

Through the supply and support of Crowcon, our portable instruments allow Point Safety’s customers to have the freedom to have reliable, efficient service with the confidence and knowledge that the equipment being provided allows for the protection of workers and their employees. Therefore, turnaround is important to Point Safety; ensuring a quick and effective service turnaround for all units is essential, ensuring minimal downtime and increased customer satisfaction.

As Point Safety provide the supply, installation and maintenance of the bespoke solutions, the implementation and servicing of their fixed systems that are provided nationwide are vital to their customers. Point Safety are confident that the continuous monitoring of these systems ensures that our customers’ and their employees’ lives are safe and that of their surroundings.

Working with Crowcon

Through continuous communication of knowledge and expertise with Point Safety, our partnership will allow for the supply of gas detection instruments to ensure the safety of those working within the oil and gas, pharmaceutical, utilities and telecommunication industries.
“We have a long-standing relationship with Point Safety, now a trusted partner in the North. Point Safety offers outstanding service to our end-users and is extremely knowledgeable on Crowcon products” – Katherine Winter, Northern Account Manager. Our partnership, Point Safety, allows for the distributors of Crowcon products throughout the UK in portable and fixed gas detectors/systems. Our partnership has also enabled Point Safety to become a Crowcon calibration site, with all its engineers fully trained and certified to Crowcon standards. “Point Safety Ltd are extremely proud to be associated with Crowcon, the leaders in gas detection systems, not only in the UK but worldwide. Their expertise, knowledge, first-class product range, and total support is second to none.” – Dawn Beever, Head of Sales and Marketing.

The Benefits of ‘Hot Swappable’ Sensors

What are ‘Hot Swappable’ Sensors?

Hot swappable sensors allow for the replacement or addition of components to a device without the need for stopping, shutting down or rebooting the production process, thus allowing for high productivity and efficiency.

Other benefits of ‘Hot swappable’ sensors

Another benefit is that it eliminates the need for hot work permits. Hot work is regularly undertaken during construction and maintenance projects and is a high-risk activity that requires careful and active risk management. These environments pose a significant risk of fire as well as safety. Hot swappable sensors are designed to avoid these potential problems entirely.

Why are they important?

Some gas detection products are designed to go into zoned areas where there can be flammable (explosive) gas present. Therefore, in environments such as a refinery, if you were to disconnect normal electronics, it usually would cause a small spark, and this is a risk as it could potentially lead to a fire or explosion. However, if the electronics have been designed so there is not a spark and have been approved as “not capable of causing an spark” by the certifying authority, these products can be disconnected and reconnected even in an explosive atmosphere without fear of sparking, ensuring that those working in these environments are kept safe.

It is possible to calibrate hot swappable sensors outside a zoned area and thus allow a rapid swapping exercise instead of a far longer calibration process. Thus, the operator need spend only a fraction of the time in the zoned area substantially avoiding personal risk.

Products with ‘Hot Swappable’ Sensors

XgardIQ is a fixed detector and transmitter compatible with Crowcon’s full range of sensor technologies. Available fitted with a variety of sensors for fixed flammable, toxic, oxygen or H2S gas detection. Providing analogue 4-20mA and RS-485 Modbus signals as standard, XgardIQ is optionally available with Alarm and Fault relays and HART communications. The 316 stainless steel is available with three M20 or 1/2“NPT cable entries. (SIL-2) Safety integrity level 2 certified fixed detector.

Find out more

Our Partnership with Sure-Safe 

Background 

Sure-safe is a gas detection specialist based in Hertfordshire. With an internal team of 18, they provide fixed and portable gas detectors and in-house service and calibration to provide suitable gas detection across many sectors, including automotive, transportation, water treatment, CHP plants and universities. 

Views on Gas Detection 

Gas detectors are essential for safety and analytical purposes, with site surveys and consultations providing tailor-made risk assessments. Sure-Safe work with customers to implement the most appropriate gas detection solution for their needs. Sure-Safe, fully appreciates the importance of ensuring the equipment required for the task is maintained, calibrated and certified.

 Working with Crowcon  

Sure-Safe and Crowcon have a long-established relationship working together to provide gas detection solutions for over 25 years. “Crowcon is a reliant manufacturer in which our robust relationship has complemented their supply.”

Connected safety – Gas Safety Insights for Environmental, Health and Safety (EHS)

In most organisations, roles related to environment, health and safety (EHS) focus heavily on risk reduction. There may be compliance responsibilities interwoven with this − EHS staff are often tasked with implementing hazard controls and may be responsible for enforcing and proving compliance – but above all the focus is on making things safer and healthier, and as productive as possible.

In the not-so-distant past, EHS staff in settings with gas hazards were often responsible for ensuring appropriate gas detection and training, and may have manually collated data from gas detectors, but beyond that they had relatively little data to use. It is hard to proactively drive down incidents or be certain how compliant with safety measures your workforce is, when all you know for sure is whether a detector did or did not sound an alarm.

However, the advent of the internet of things (IoT) has changed all that. Now, EHS staff can connect gas detection systems to the cloud just as they connect a fitness tracker or in-car satellite navigation system, and benefit from the many gas insights this provides. Cloud-based software applications like Crowcon Connect make it easy for EHS staff to identify problems with specific devices (and users!), track and schedule maintenance, automate many aspects of compliance audit and trouble-shoot recurrent problems.

What does connected safety mean for EHS personnel?

In a word: data. Connecting gas monitoring systems to the cloud allows EHS personnel to gather actionable insights (data) from their detector fleet, which they can act upon to improve safety. These include the ‘traditional’ elements such as time in/out of use, exposure levels and alarms sounded, but go far beyond these to include information about individuals’ use of the device (for example, the extent to which an individual/group uses the detector correctly) and where devices are at any given time.

With Crowcon Connect, the ability to use quick user assignment allows EHS staff to optimise their data by linking a specific device with a known user, each and every time, regardless of whether the device is assigned to an individual long term or is part of a pool.

What is quick user assignment?

In this context, quick user assignment is the ability to link or associate a specified user with a specified device, in a swift and straightforward way. For example, Crowcon Connect can use the RFID tags in a user’s ID badge to link them to a given device. This has dual benefits: firstly, the EHS staff know that the information on that device relates to a named individual and secondly, they can trust the data because it is collected and archived automatically, with no risk of human error.

How will connected safety work? Who will it work for?

Connected safety works for the entire organisation; when deployed strategically it can increase safety, improve staff morale and provide a wealth of information about productivity, the working environment and compliance. For EHS staff in particular, a good cloud software package for their gas detector fleet maximises and automates the collection of data while reducing the risk of human error in data capture – this is not only vital to ensure safety, but also makes it far easier to collate the records required at any compliance audit, and reduces the burden of manual (error-prone) documentation. And, when devices are pre-assigned to specific workers, the monitoring of compliance becomes both more accurate and straightforward.

Interested in learning more? Click here to read more about Crowcon’s own cloud software solution.