Why is gas detection crucial for drink dispense systems

Dispense gas known as beer gas, keg gas, cellar gas or pub gas is used in bars and restaurants as well as the leisure and hospitality industry. Using dispense gas in the process of dispensing beer and soft drinks is common practice worldwide. Carbon dioxide (CO2) or a mix of CO2 and nitrogen (N2) is used as a way of delivering a beverage to the ‘tap’. CO2 as a keg gas helps to keep the contents sterile and at the right composition aiding dispensing.

Gas Hazards

Even when the beverage is ready to deliver, gas-related hazards remain. Those arise in any activity at premises that contain compressed gas cylinders, due to the risk of damage during their movement or replacement. Additionally, once released there is a risk of increased carbon dioxide levels or depleted oxygen levels (due to higher levels of nitrogen or carbon dioxide).

CO2 occurs naturally in the atmosphere (0.04%) and is colourless and odourless. It is heavier than air and if it escapes, will tend to sink to the floor. CO2 collects in cellars and at the bottom of containers and confined spaces such as tanks and silos. CO2 is generated in large amounts during fermentation. It is also injected into beverages during carbonation – to add the bubbles. Early symptoms of exposure to high levels of carbon dioxide include dizziness, headaches, and confusion, followed by loss of consciousness. Accidents and fatalities can occur in extreme cases where a significant amount of carbon dioxide leaks into an enclosed or poorly ventilated volume. Without proper detection methods and processes in place, everyone entering that volume could be at risk. Additionally, personnel within surrounding volumes could suffer from the early symptoms listed above.

Nitrogen (N2) is often used in the dispensing of beer, particularly stouts, pale ales and porters, it also as well as preventing oxidisation or pollution of beer with harsh flavours. Nitrogen helps push the liquid from one tank to another, as well as offer the potential to be injected into kegs or barrels, pressurising them ready for storage and shipment. This gas is not toxic, but does displace oxygen in the atmosphere, which can be a danger if there is a gas leak which is why accurate gas detection is critical.

As nitrogen can deplete oxygen levels, oxygen sensors should be used in environments where any of these potential risks exist. When locating oxygen sensors, consideration needs to be given to the density of the diluting gas and the “breathing” zone (nose level). Ventilation patterns must also be considered when locating sensors. For example, if the diluting gas is nitrogen, then placing the detection at shoulder height is reasonable, however if the diluting gas is carbon dioxide, then the detectors should be placed at knee height.

The Importance of Gas Detection in Drinks Dispense Systems

Unfortunately, accidents and fatalities do occur in the drinks industry due to gas hazards. As a result, in the UK, safe workplace exposure limits are codified by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) in documentation for the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH). Carbon dioxide has an 8-hour exposure limit of 0.5% and a 15-minute exposure limit of 1.5% by volume. Gas detection systems help to mitigate gas risks and allow for drinks manufacturers, bottling plants and bar/pub cellar owners, to ensure the safety of personnel and demonstrate compliance to legislative limits or approved codes of practice.

Oxygen Depletion

The normal concentration of oxygen in the atmosphere is approximately 20.9% volume. Oxygen levels can be dangerous if they are too low (oxygen depletion). In the absence of adequate ventilation, the level of oxygen can be reduced surprisingly quickly by breathing and combustion processes.

Oxygen levels may also be depleted due to dilution by other gases such as carbon dioxide (also a toxic gas), nitrogen or helium, and chemical absorption by corrosion processes and similar reactions. Oxygen sensors should be used in environments where any of these potential risks exist. When locating oxygen sensors, consideration needs to be given to the density of the diluting gas and the “breathing” zone (nose level). Oxygen monitors usually provide a first-level alarm when the oxygen concentration has dropped to 19% volume. Most people will begin to behave abnormally when the level reaches 17%, and hence a second alarm is usually set at this threshold. Exposure to atmospheres containing between 10% and 13% oxygen can bring about unconsciousness very rapidly; death comes very quickly if the oxygen level drops below 6% volume.

Our Solution

Gas detection can be provided in the form of both fixed and portable detectors. Installation of a fixed gas detector can benefit a larger space such as cellars or plant rooms to provide continuous area and staff protection 24 hours a day. However, for worker safety in and around cylinder storage area and in spaces designated as a confined space, a portable detector can be more suited. This is especially true for pubs and beverage dispensing outlets for the safety of workers and those who are unfamiliar in the environment such as delivery drivers, sales teams or equipment technicians. The portable unit can easily be clipped to clothing and will detect pockets of COusing alarms and visual signals, indicating that the user should immediately vacate the area.

For more information about gas detection in drink dispense systems, contact our team.

The importance of Gas Detection in the Water and Wastewater Industry 

Water is vital to our daily lives, both for personal and domestic use and industrial/commercial applications. Whether a facility focuses on the production of clean, potable water or treating effluent, Crowcon is proud to serve a wide variety of water industry clients, providing gas detection equipment that keeps workers safe around the world. 

Gas Hazards 

Apart from common gas hazards known in the industry; methane, hydrogen sulphide, and oxygen, there are bi-product gas hazards and cleaning material gas hazards that occur from purifying chemicals such as ammonia, chlorine, chlorine dioxide or ozone that are used in the decontamination of the waste and effluent water, or to remove microbes from clean water. There is great potential for many toxic or explosive gases to exist as a result of the chemicals used in the water industry. And added to these are chemicals that may be spilled or dumped into the waste system from industry, farming or building work. 

Safety Considerations  

Confined Space Entry 

The pipelines used to transport water require regular cleaning and safety checks; during these operations, portable multi-gas monitors are used to protect the workforce. Pre-entry checks must be completed prior to entering any confined space and commonly O2, CO, H2S and CH4 are monitored. Confined spaces are small, so portable monitors must be compact and unobtrusive for the user, yet able to withstand the wet and dirty environments in which they must perform. Clear and prompt indication of any increase in gas monitored (or any decrease for oxygen) is of paramount importance – loud and bright alarms are effective in raising the alarm to the user. 

Risk assessment 

Risk assessment is critical, as you need to be aware of the environment that you are entering and thus working in. Therefore, understanding the applications and identifying the risks regarding all safety aspects. Focusing on gas monitoring, as part of the risk assessment, you need to be clear on what gases may be present.  

Fit for purpose 

There is a variety of applications within the water treatment process, giving the need to monitor multiple gases, including carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulphide, chlorine, methane, oxygen, ozone and chlorine dioxide. Gas detectors are available for single or multiple gas monitoring, making them practical for different applications as well as making sure that, if conditions change (such as sludge is stirred up, causing a sudden increase in hydrogen sulphide and flammable gas levels), the worker is still protected.  

Legislation   

European Commission Directive 2017/164 issued in January 2017, established a new list of indicative occupational exposure limit values (IOELVs). IOELV are health-based, non-binding values, derived from the most recent scientific data available and considering the availability of reliable measurement techniques. The list includes carbon monoxide, nitrogen monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, sulphur dioxide, hydrogen cyanide, manganese, diacetyl and many other chemicals. The list is based on Council Directive 98/24/EC that considers the protection of the health and safety of workers from the risks related to chemical agents in the workplace. For any chemical agent for which an IOELV has been set at Union level, Member States are required to establish a national occupational exposure limit value. They also are required to take into account the Union limit value, determining the nature of the national limit value in accordance with national legislation and practice. Member States will be able to benefit from a transitional period ending at the latest on 21 August 2023.  

The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) state that each year several workers will suffer from at least one episode of work-related illness. Although, most illnesses are relatively mild cases of gastroenteritis, there is also a risk for potentially fatal diseases, such as leptospirosis (Weil’s disease) and hepatitis. Even though these are reported to the HSE, there could be significant under-reporting as there is often failure to recognise the link between illness and work.  

Under domestic law of the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974, employers are responsible for ensuring the safety of their employees and others. This responsibility is reinforced by regulations. 

The Confined Spaces Regulations 1997 applies where the assessment identifies risks of serious injury from work in confined spaces. These regulations contain the following key duties: 

  • Avoid entry to confined spaces, e.g., by doing the work from the outside. 
  • If entry to a confined space is unavoidable, follow a safe system of work.
  • Put in place adequate emergency arrangements before the work start. 

The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999 requires employers and self-employed people to carry out a suitable and sufficient assessment of the risks for all work activities for the purpose of deciding what measures are necessary for safety. For work in confined spaces this means identifying the hazards present, assessing the risks and determining what precautions to take. 

Our solutions

Elimination of these gas hazards is virtually impossible, so permanent workers and contractors must depend on reliable gas detection equipment to protect them. Gas detection can be provided in both fixed and portable forms. Our portable gas detectors protect against a wide range of gas hazards, these include T4x, Clip SGD, Gasman, Tetra 3,Gas-Pro, T4 and Detective+. Our fixed gas detectors are used in many applications where reliability, dependability and lack of false alarms are instrumental to efficient and effective gas detection, these include Xgard, Xgard Bright and IRmax. Combined with a variety of our fixed detectors, our gas detection control panels offer a flexible range of solutions that measure flammable, toxic and oxygen gases, report their presence and activate alarms or associated equipment, for the wastewater industry our panels include Gasmaster.    

To find out more on the gas hazards in wastewater and water treatment visit our industry page for more information.  

An Introduction to the Marine Industry

The marine sector is a global industry and is wide ranging in terms of its applications and different types of vessels including FPSO vessels, ferries and submarines. 

The type of gas hazards that will be present, and subsequently the gas detection requirements, are heavily dependent on the application and the type of marine vessel being used. In this blog we’ll take a look at some of the most common gas hazards within the marine industry and in which applications they are most likely to occur. 

Floating Production, Storage, Offloading Units and Tankers 

Floating production, storage and offloading (FPSO) units, which are used in the production, processing and storage of oil, are home to many potential gas hazards. 

Firstly, there is the risk of fire and explosion hazards, which can lead to catastrophic damage and loss of life.  Combustible gas risks that may be present include methane, hydrogen, propane, LPG, solvents and gasoline fumes among others. Due to this risk, flammable gas detection is essential on FPSO vessels.  

FPSO units also have confined spaces in the form of inverted tanks or voids, meaning oxygen detectors are a must for these areas to protect from the risks of oxygen depletion which can cause mental confusion, nausea, weakness and in extreme cases loss of consciousness and death. 

Ferries 

Whilst ferries may not be home to as many gas hazards as other vessels, there are certainly still some to be aware of. On vehicle carrying ferries, for example, there may be a large build-up of emissions from vehicle exhausts which contain harmful gases such as carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide. Both gases are capable of causing damage to human health, causing issues such as nausea, confusion and disorientation, inflammation of the airways and increased vulnerability to respiratory infection. 

Submarines 

Submarines may be used for a variety of purposes including salvage and exploration operations, marine science and facility inspection and maintenance. On these vessels there may be a requirement for hydrogen detection in battery storage rooms. Whilst hydrogen is a non-toxic gas, if it builds up in environments without sufficient airflow it can displace oxygen in the air leading to risk of oxygen depletion. 

Our solutions 

Gas detection can be provided in both fixed and portable forms. Our portable gas detectors protect people against a wide range of gas hazards, and include T4xGas-ProT4 and Gas-Pro TK. Our fixed gas detectors are used where reliability, dependability and lack of false alarms are instrumental to efficient and effective protection of assets and areas. Now available through Crowcon, the Sensitron SMART S-MS MED fixed detector has been designed specifically for use in marine environments. The SMART S-MS MED is fully marine certified by Lloyd’s Register in accordance with MED/3.54 Regulation whilst also being SIL-2 certified. Also available is the Multiscan++MED control panel, also MED and SIL-2 certified, able to manage and monitor up to 64 gas detectors. 

To find out more on the gas hazards in the marine sector visit our industry page for more information.

Are there dangers of gas in telecommunications? 

The telecommunication industry contains includes cable providers, internet service providers, satellite providers and telephone providers and confined spaces. Even simple above ground termination boxes may contain gas hazards generated from the cable runs underground. Gases such as methane, carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulphide can run through cable trunking accumulating in termination boxes and manifesting as hazards when the termination box is opened.

The risk of danger occurs when a worker is sent to carry out tasks involving opening up of enclosed volumes that may not have been accessed for a period of time. All telecommunications companies have these in abundance.

What are the Dangers?

Those working in the telecommunications industry are at risk from a variety of gaseous dangers, many of which could cause harm to their health and safety. Though less obvious, these risks should be taken as seriously as falls from heights or electrocution, and they require a similar level of training. A worker must not climb to an elevated position without a harness, similarly they shouldn’t be accessing confined spaces without appropriate confined space training. Awareness of the dangers present and minimising the risks that could lead to adverse effects is a well-known safety principle. Training and proper PPE can help protect workers from these hazards.

Gas Hazards and Risks

As there are many confined spaces in the telecommunication industry workers are at risk from the presence of hazardous and toxic gases there. Hazardous gases can also be linked to seemingly simple above-ground termination boxes. Gases such as methane, carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulphide sometimes travel through the cable trunking, and therefore, when the termination box is opened, a build-up of these gases can be released.

Enclosed or partially enclosed spaces with high levels of methane in the air reduce the amount of oxygen available to breathe and therefore can cause mood changes, speech and vision problems, memory loss, nausea, sickness, facial flushing and headaches. In more severe cases and prolonged exposure, there may be changes in breathing and heart rate, balance problems, numbness, and unconsciousness. There is also a risk of fire as methane is highly flammable.

Carbon monoxide (CO) consumption also poses serious health issues to workers, with those ingesting the toxic substance facing flu-like symptoms, chest pain, confusion, fainting arrhythmias, seizures, or even worse health effects for high or long lasting exposures. Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) poisoning causes similar issues, as well as delirium, tremors, convulsions, and skin and eye irritation. Carbon dioxide is an asphyxiant gas that can displace oxygen and hance dizziness.

Our solution

Gas detection can be provided in both fixed and portable forms. Our portable gas detectors protect against a wide range of gas hazards, these include Tetra 3 and T4. Our fixed gas detectors are used where reliability, dependability and lack of false alarms are instrumental to efficient and effective gas detection, these include Xgard and Xgard Bright. Combined with a variety of our fixed detectors, our gas detection control panels offer a flexible range of solutions which are able to measure flammable, toxic and oxygen gases, report their presence and activate alarms or associated equipment, for the telecommunication industry our panels include Gasmaster.

To find out more on the dangers of gas hazards in telecommunication visit our industry page for more information.

Transportation and Key Gas Challenges 

The transportation sector is one of the largest industries in the world, spanning a variety of applications. The sector offers services concerned with the movement of people and cargo of all types, across air freight and logistics, airlines and airport services, road and rail, transportation infrastructure, trucking, highways, rail tracks, and marine ports and services.

Gas hazards during transportation  

The transport of dangerous goods is regulated in order to prevent, accidents involving people or property, damage to the environment. There a numerous gas hazards including the transportation of hazardous material, air conditioning emissions, cabin combustion and hangar leaks. 

The transportation of hazardous materials poses a risk to those involved. There are nine classification areas specified by the United Nations (UN) including explosives, gases, flammable liquids and solids, oxidising substances, toxic substances, radioactive materials, corrosive substances and miscellaneous goods. With the risk of an accident occurring being more likely when transporting these materials. Although the biggest cause for concern within the industry being the transportation of non-flammable non-toxic gas is asphyxiation. As a slow leak in a storage container can drain all of the oxygen in the air and cause the individuals in the environment to suffocate. 

Leaks within aircraft hangars and fuel storage areas of highly explosive aviation fuel is an area that must be monitored to prevent fires, equipment damage, and at the worst fatalities. It is essential to choose a suitable gas detection solution that focuses on the aircraft rather than the aircraft hangar, avoids false alarms, and can monitor large areas. 

Not only is it the external environment that faces gas risks in transportation, those working in the sector also face similar challenges. Air conditioning emissions poses a gas hazard threat due to the burning of fossil fuels leading to a subsequent emission of carbon monoxide (CO). high levels of CO in a confined area such as a vehicle cabin, of more than the normal level (30ppm) or an oxygen level below normal (19%) can result in dizziness, feeling and being sick, tiredness and confusion, stomach pain, shortness of breath and difficulty breathing. Therefore, proper ventilation in these spaces with the assistance of a gas detector is paramount to ensuring the safe of those working in the transportation industry. 

Similarly, in the air sector cabin combustion and fuselage fires, in the central portion of an airplane, poses a real threat. Although flame retardant materials are applied, if a fire does start the cabin’s trim and fittings can still generate toxic gases and vapours that could be more dangerous than the fire itself. Inhalation of harmful gases caused by a fire in these environments tend to be the main direct cause of fatalities.

Transportation Standards and Certifications 

Each mode of transport, (road, rail, air, sea and inland waterway) has its own regulations but they are generally harmonized with the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE). The Hazardous Materials Transportation Act (HMTA), enacted in the USA in 1975, states that regardless of the type of transportation, any company whose goods fall into one of the nine categories specified as hazardous by the UN, must comply with the regulations or risk fines and penalties. 

Those working in the transport sector in the UK must comply with the requirements laid out in the UN Model Regulations which assigns each dangerous substance or article a specific class that correlates how dangerous it is. It does this via the packing group (PG) classification, according to PG I, PG II or PG III. 

From an European standpoint the International Carriage of Dangerous Goods by Road (ADR) governs the regulations on how to classify, pack, label and certify dangerous goods. It also comprises vehicle and tank requirements and other operational requirements. The Carriage of Dangerous Goods and Use of Transportable Pressure Equipment Regulations (2009) also is relevant in England, Wales and Scotland. 

Other relevant regulations include the International Carriage of Dangerous Goods by Inland Navigation (ADN), the International Maritime Dangerous Goods (IMDG) and The International Civil Aviation Organization’s (ICAO) Technical Instruction.

Our solution 

Gas detection can be provided in both fixed and portable forms. Our portable gas detectors protect against a wide range of gas hazards, these include T4x, Clip SGD, Gasman, Tetra 3, Gas-pro, and T4. Our fixed gas detectors are used where reliability, dependability and lack of false alarms are instrumental to efficient and effective gas detection, these include Xgard, Xgard Bright, and IRmax. Combined with a variety of our fixed detectors, our gas detection control panels offer a flexible range of solutions which are able to measure flammable, toxic and oxygen gases, report their presence and activate alarms or associated equipment, for the transportation industry our panels include Gasmaster and Vortex 

To find out more on the dangers of gas hazards in transportation visit our industry page for more information.  

Our Partnership with CSL

Background

CSL is one of the largest providers of gas detection in the Irish market and the leading provider of plant and supporting services to the water, wastewater, environmental and industrial sectors. With headquarters in County Carlow, Republic of Ireland, CSL provide 24 hours, 7 days a week, 365 days a year maintenance and support to their customers nationwide through their network of engineers and support personnel located across the country. CSL is a customer-focused company providing a one-stop-shop to their clients. With over 30 years of experience, CSL delivers effective gas detection solutions for the long term. CSL supplies a wide range of gas detection products, from portable devices to complete fixed gas detection systems and customised installations in many sectors. 

Views on gas detection

As a critical safety issue, CSL put the design, equipment selection, long-term maintenance, and clarity of the alarm system to the forefront of our gas detection solutions. “We understand that there is always a balance between investment and striving for the highest level of gas safety. Still, from our point of view, safety wins every time as cutting costs in an area as vital as gas safety is a false economy. This is one of the main reasons we work very hard to develop the relationship and partnership and promote the Crowcon Gas Safety product range. When we meet with our clients and discuss their gas safety challenges, the conversation inevitably discusses costs. Because of the sizeable Crowcon product range, we always have a solution that will meet their budget and safety requirements.”- Peter Nicholson, Head of Marketing. 

Working with Crowcon

A 30-year partnership and continued communication have allowed CSL to supply their customers with gas detection solutions. “Providing fixed and portable solutions ensures a gas safety package that will work for any company or organisation that depends on high-quality gas detection and related equipment.” – Peter Nicholson, Head of Marketing. We’re thrilled to be working alongside CSL to provide gas detection to the Irish market and support with services to the water, wastewater, environmental and industrial sectors. With over 30 years of experience, CSL delivers effective gas detection solutions for the long term through the supply of our portable devices and fixed gas detection systems. 

Our Partnership with Shawcity 

Background

Established in 1976, Shawcity was one of the first companies to introduce specialist gas detection devices to the UK and Irish markets from leading manufacturers around the world. For over 45 years, they have focused on providing the latest monitoring technology in partnership with leading manufacturers to customers across the UK and Ireland.  

Shawcity supports those working in health and safety, occupational hygiene and environmental applications who rely on achieving the highest levels of performance. With instruments available to hire or buy, Shawcity has the capacity to ensure each order is tailored to meet individual project demands. Their portfolio offers an extensive range of monitoring detection including fixed gas detection, potable gas detection and air quality.  

Views on Gas Detection

As the focus on workplace health continues to develop, a better understanding of the ways workers can be impacted is leading to changes in legislation and an increasing responsibility for employers to protect their employees at work. Gas detection, in particular, is critical in terms of potential safety and can, in some cases, involve an immediate threat to life. Ensuring the correct equipment is provided and maintained is one of the key responsibilities that health and safety officers have.  

The latest technology also means that effective monitoring on a personal, area or environmental level has never been easier to achieve. Shawcity works with every customer to ensure the right equipment is supplied for the job every time and also offer free product training. 

Working with Crowcon

The partnership between Crowcon and Shawcity provides an unbeatable combination of industry knowledge and expertise. The two companies work closely together on fixed gas detection projects across many sectors to provide the complete package, from site surveys, planning and design through to installation, commissioning and ongoing service and maintenance.  

Now supplying our portable range, Shawcity now can support an even wider range of new markets and sectors. “Shawcity is an official Trusted Partner. Crowcon and Shawcity collaborate at every stage of the gas detection process – from product development through to technical support – to deliver the best possible service to customers” – Nathan Marks, Fixed Gas Detection Manager at Shawcity. 

Detecting dangers in dairy: What gases should you be aware of? 

Global demand for dairy continues to increase in large part due to population growth, rising incomes and urbanisation. Millions of farmers worldwide tend approximately 270 million dairy cows to produce milk. Throughout the dairy farm industry there are a variety of gas hazards that pose a risk to those working in the dairy industry.  

What are the dangers workers face in the dairy industry?

Chemicals

Throughout the dairy farm industry, chemicals are used for variety of tasks including cleaning, applying various treatments such as vaccinations or medications, antibiotics, sterilising and spraying. If these chemicals and hazardous substances are not used or stored correctly, this can result in serious harm to the worker or the surrounding environment. Not only can these chemicals cause illness, but there is also a risk of death if a person is exposed. Some chemicals can be flammable and explosive whilst others are corrosive and poisonous. 

There are several ways to manage these chemical hazards, although the main concern should be in implementing a process and procedure. This procedure should ensure all staff are trained in the safe use of chemicals with records being maintained. As part of the chemical procedure, this should include a chemical manifest for tracking purposes. This type of inventory management allows for all personal to have access to Safety Data Sheets (SDS) as well as usage and location records. Alongside this manifest, there should be consideration for the review of current operation.  

  • What is the current procedure?  
  • What PPE is required?  
  • What is the process for discarding out of date chemicals and is there is a substitute chemical that could pose less of a risk to your workers? 

Confined Spaces

There are numerous circumstances that could require a worker to enter a confined space, including feed silos, milk vats, water tanks and pits in the dairy industry. The safest way to eliminate a confined space hazard, as mentioned by many industry bodies, is to employ a safe design. This will include the removal of any need to enter a confined space. Although, this may not be realistic and from time to time, cleaning routines need to take place, or a blockage may occur, however, there is a requirement to ensure there is the correct procedures to address the hazard. 

Chemical agents when used in a confined space can increase the risk of suffocation with gases pushing out oxygen. One way you can eliminate this risk is by cleaning the vat from the outside using a high-pressure hose. If a worker does need to enter the confined space, check that the correct signage is in place since entry and exit points will be restricted. You should consider isolation switches and check that your staff understand the correct emergency rescue procedure if something were to happen. 

Gas Hazards

Ammonia (NH3) is found in animal waste and slurry spreading on farming and agricultural land. It is characteristically a colourless gas with a pungent smell that arises through the decomposition of nitrogen compounds in animal waste. Not only is it harmful to human health but also harmful to livestock wellbeing, due to its ability to cause respiratory diseases in livestock, and eye irritation, blindness, lung damage, alongside nose and throat damage and even death in humans. Ventilation is a key requirement in preventing health issues, as poor ventilation heightens the damage caused by this gas.  

Carbon dioxide (CO2) is naturally produced in the atmosphere; although, levels are increased through farming and agricultural processes. CO2, is colourless, odourless, and is emitted from agricultural equipment, crop and livestock production and other farming processes. CO2 can congregate areas, such as waste tanks and silos. This results in oxygen in the air to be displaced and increasing the risk of suffocation for animals and humans.  Sealed silos, waste and grain storage spaces are specifically dangerous as CO2 can accumulate here and lead to them being unsuitable for humans without an external air supply. 

Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is one of a group of highly reactive gases known as oxides of nitrogen or nitrogen oxides (NOx). At worst, it can cause sudden death when consumed even from short term exposure. This gas can cause suffocation and is emitted from silos following specific chemical reactions of plant material. It is recognisable by its bleach-like smell and its properties tend to create a red-brown haze. As it gathers above certain surfaces it can run into areas with livestock through silo chutes, and therefore poses a real danger to humans and animals in the surrounding area. It can also affect lung function, cause internal bleeding, and ongoing respiratory problems. 

When should gas detectors be used?

Gas detectors provide added value anywhere on dairy farms and around slurry silos, but above all: 

  • When and where slurry is being mixed 
  • During pumping and bringing out slurry
  • On and around the tractor during slurry mixing or spreading 
  • In the stable during maintenance work on slurry pumps, slurry scrapers and the like 
  • Near and around small openings and cracks in the floor, e.g., around milking robots 
  • Low to the ground in poorly ventilated corners and spaces (H2S is heavier than air and sinks to the floor) 
  • In slurry silos 
  • In slurry tanks 

Products that can help to protect yourself 

Gas detection can be provided in both fixed and portable forms. Installation of a fixed gas detector can benefit a larger space to provide continuous area and staff protection 24 hours a day. However, a portable detector can be more suited for worker’s safety. 

To find out more on the dangers in agriculture and farming, visit our industry page for more information. 

Our Partnership With Teksal 

Background

Crowcon has been working with Australian-based industrial safety supplier Teksal Safety for more than 10 years, so we thought we’d share some of the ways it helps support our gas detection solutions. 

Founded in 2002, Teksal Safety provides industrial safety solutions for process and pressure safety, machine and automation safety, and operations and maintenance safety applications in industrial, mining, and oil and gas sectors. They work with safety professionals, engineers, plant operators, and maintenance personnel to deliver optimal solutions and minimise risk. Focused on providing industrial safety solutions that help protect people, plant, process, Teksal Safety sources and supplies a range of Crowcon’s portable and fixed gas detectors for diverse applications. 

Views on Gas Detection  

While oil and gas operators and teams working in environments with flammable and toxic gases are exposed to some level of risk, Teksal Safety strives to provide proven industrial safety solutions to help mitigate this risk, including Crowcon’s suite of gas detection products. 

By focusing firstly on awareness of risk, then embedding best practice and innovative solutions, Teksal Safety helps industrial operators provide a safe work environment for their people, and safe ways of working, through its distribution and maintenance of Crowcon gas detection products. 

Teksal Safety’s goal is to “protect people, plant and process. Safety culture often emphasises administrative controls and things like PPE. While these play a key role within a wider HSE programme, we focus on engineered controls to mitigate risk at a high level. While we have solutions that tackle administrative issues that capture residual risk, our main aim is to mitigate the risks further up the chain.” – Joe Hischar, Managing Director.  

Working with Crowcon 

While oil and gas operators and teams working in environments with flammable and toxic gases are exposed to some level of risk, Teksal Safety strives to provide proven industrial safety solutions to help mitigate this risk, including Crowcon’s suite of gas detection products. Our collaboration allows Teksal to source and supply a range of personal gas detectors to meet diverse applications and requirements. “Working on remote sites in Australia can be challenging. As its products are designed with safety in mind, Crowcon allows us to provide proven safety solutions and help protect our customers’ people, plant and process.” – Joe Hischar, Managing Director.  

The Benefits of MPS Sensors 

Developed by NevadaNano, Molecular Property Spectrometer™ (MPS™) sensors represent the new generation of flammable gas detectors. MPS™ can quickly detect over 15 characterised flammable gases at once. Until recently, anyone who needed to monitor flammable gases had to select either a traditional flammable gas detector containing a pellistor sensor calibrated for a specific gas, or containing an infra-red (IR) sensor which also varies in output according to the flammable gas being measured, and hence needs to be calibrated for each gas. While these remain beneficial solutions, they are not always ideal. For example, both sensor types require regular calibration and the catalytic pellistor sensors also need frequent bump testing to ensure they have not been damaged by contaminants (known as ‘sensor poisoning’ agents) or by harsh conditions. In some environments, sensors must frequently be changed, which is costly in terms of both money and downtime, or product availability. IR technology cannot detect hydrogen – which has no IR signature, and both IR and pellistor detectors sometimes incidentally detect other (i.e., non-calibrated) gases, giving inaccurate readings that may trigger false alarms or concern operators. 

The MPS™ sensor delivers key features that provide real world tangible benefits to operator and hence workers. These include: 

No calibration  

When implementing a system containing a fixed head detector, it is common practice to service on a recommended schedule defined by manufacturer. This entails ongoing regular costs as well potentially disrupting production or process in order service or even gain access to detector or multiple detectors. There may also be a risk to personnel when detectors are mounted in particularly hazardous environments. Interaction with an MPS sensor is less stringent because there are no unrevealed failure modes, provided air is present. It would be wrong to say there is no calibration requirement. One factory calibration, followed by a gas test when commissioning is sufficient, because there is an internal automated calibration being performed every 2 seconds throughout the working life of the sensor. What is really meant is – no customer calibration. 

The Xgard Bright with MPS™ sensor technology does not require calibration. This in turn reduces the interaction with the detector resulting in a lower total cost of ownership over the sensor life cycle and reduced risk to personnel and production output to complete regular maintenance. It is still advisable to check the cleanliness of the gas detector from time to time, since gas can’t get through thick build ups of obstructive material and wouldn’t then reach the sensor. 

Multi species gas – ‘True LEL’™  

Many industries and applications use or have as a by-product multiple gases within the same environment. This can be challenging for traditional sensor technology which can detect only a single gas that they were calibrated for at the correct level and can result in inaccurate reading and even false alarms which can halt process or production if another flammable gas type is present. The lack of response or over response frequently faced in multi gas environments can be frustrating and counterproductive compromising safety of best user practices. The MPS™ sensor can accurately detect multiple gases at once and instantly identify gas type. Additionally, the MPS™ sensor has a on board environmental compensation and does not require an externally applied correctional factor. Inaccurate readings and false alarms are a thing of the past.  

No sensor poisoning  

In certain environments traditional sensor types can be under risk of poisoning. Extreme pressure, temperature, and humidity all have the potential to damage sensors whist environmental toxins and contaminants can ‘poison’ sensors, leading to severely compromised performance. Detectors in environments where poisons or inhibitors may be encountered, regular and frequent testing is the only way to ensure that performance is not being degraded. Sensor failure due to poisoning can be a costly experience. The technology in the MPS™ sensor is not affected by contaminates in the environment. Processes that have contaminates now have access to a solution that operates reliably with fail safe design to alert operator to offer a peace of mind for personnel and assets located in hazardous environment. Additionally, the MPS sensor is not harmed by elevated flammable gas concentrations, which may cause cracking in conventional catalytic sensor types for example. The MPS sensor carries on working. 

Hydrogen (H2)

The usage of Hydrogen in industrial processes is increasing as the focus to find a cleaner alternative to natural gas usage. Detection of Hydrogen is currently restricted to pellistor, metal oxide semiconductor, electrochemical and less accurate thermal conductivity sensor technology due to Infra-Red sensors inability to detect Hydrogen. When faced with challenges highlighted above in poisoning or false alarms, the current solution can leave operator with frequent bump testing and servicing in addition to false alarm challenges. The MPS™ sensor provides a far better solution for Hydrogen detection, removing the challenges faced with traditional sensor technology. A long-life, relatively fast responding hydrogen sensor that does not require calibration throughout the life cycle of the sensor, without the risk of poisoning or false alarms, can significantly save on total cost of ownership and reduces interaction with unit resulting in peace of mind and reduced risk for operators leveraging MPS™ technology. All of this is possible thanks to MPS™ technology, which is the biggest breakthrough in gas detection for several decades. The Gasman with MPS is hydrogen (H2) ready. A single MPS sensor accurately detects hydrogen and common hydrocarbons in a fail-safe, poison-resistant solution without recalibration.

For more on Crowcon, visit https://www.crowcon.com or for more on MPSTM visit https://www.crowcon.com/mpsinfixed/