What’s so Important about my Monitors Measuring Range?

What is a Monitor Measuring Range?

Gas monitoring is usually measured in PPM range (parts per million), percentage volume or percentage of LEL (lower explosive limit) this enables Safety Managers, to ensure that their operators are not being exposed to any potentially harmful levels of gases or chemicals. Gas monitoring can be done remotely to ensure that the area is clean before a worker enters the area as well as monitoring gas through a permanently fixed device or body worn portable device to detect any potentially leaks or hazardous areas during the course of the working shift.  

Why are Gas Monitors essential and what are the Ranges of deficiencies or enrichments?

There are three main reasons why monitors are needed; it is essential to detect oxygen deficiencies or enrichment as too little oxygen can prevent the human body from functioning leading to the worker losing consciousness. Unless the oxygen level can be restored to a normal level the worker is at risk of potential death. An atmosphere is considered to be deficient when the concentration of O2 is less than 19.5%. Consequently, an environment that has too much oxygen in it is equally dangerous as this constitutes a greatly increased risk of fire and explosion, this is considered when the concentration level of O2 is over 23.5%. 

Monitors are required when Toxic Gases are present of which can cause considerable harm to the human body. Hydrogen Sulphide (H2S) is a classic example of this. H2S is given off by bacteria when it breaks down organic matter, due to this gas being heavier than air, it can displace air leading to potential harm to persons present and is also a broad-spectrum toxic poison.  

Additionally, gas monitors have the ability to detect flammable gases. Dangers that can be prevented through using a gas monitor are not only though inhaling but they are a potential hazard due to combustion. gas monitors with an LEL range sensor detects and alert against flammable gases.  

Why are they important and how do they work?

Measurement or Measuring Range is the total range that the device can measure in normal conditions. The term normal meaning no overpressure limits (OPL) and within maximum working pressure (MWP).  These values are usually found on the product website or specification datasheet. The measuring range can also be calculated by identifying the difference between the Upper Range Limit (URL) and the Lower Range Limit (LRL) of the device. When trying to determine the range of the detector it is not identifying the area of square footage or within a fixed radius of the detector but instead is identifying the yielding or diffusion of the area being monitored. The process happens as the sensors respond to the gases that penetrate through the monitor’s membranes. Therefore, the devices have the ability to detect gas that is in immediate contact with the monitor. This  highlights the significance of understanding the measuring range of gas detectors and highlight their importance for the safety of the workers present in these environments.   

Are there any products that are available?

Crowcon offer a range of portable monitors; The Gas-Pro portable multi gas detector offers detection of up to 5 gases in a compact and rugged solution. It has an easy-to-read top mount display making it easy to use and optimal for confined space gas detection. An optional internal pump, activated with the flow plate, takes the pain out of pre-entry testing and allows Gas-Pro to be worn either in pumped or diffusion modes. 

The T4 portable 4-in-1 gas detector provides effective protection against 4 common gas hazards: carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulphide, flammable gases and oxygen depletion. The T4 multi gas detector now comes with improved detection of pentane, hexane and other long chain hydrocarbons. Offering you compliance, robustness and low cost of ownership in a simple to use solution. T4 contains a wide range of powerful features to make everyday use easier and safer. 

The Gasman portable single gas detector is compact and lightweight yet is fully ruggedised for the toughest of industrial environments. Featuring simple single button operation, it has a large easy-to-read display of gas concentration, and audible, visual and vibrating alarms.  

Crowcon also offer a flexible range of fixed gas detection products that can detect flammable, toxic and oxygen gases, report their presence and activate alarms or associated equipment. We use a variety of measurement, protection and communications technologies and our fixed detectors have been proven in many arduous environments, including oil and gas exploration, water treatment, chemical plants and steel mills. These fixed gas detectors are used in many applications where reliability, dependability and lack of false alarms are instrumental to efficient and effective gas detection. These include within the automotive and aerospace manufacturing sectors, on scientific and research facilities and in high-utilisation medical, civil or commercial plants. 

Why HVAC professionals are at risk from Carbon Monoxide – and how to manage it

Carbon Monoxide (CO) is an odourless, colourless and tasteless gas that is also highly toxic and potentially flammable (at higher levels: 10.9% Volume or 109,000ppm). It is produced by the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels such as wood, oil, coal, paraffin, LPG, petrol and natural gas. Many HVAC systems and units burn fossil fuels, so it’s not hard to see why HVAC professionals may be exposed to CO in their work. Perhaps you have, in the past, felt dizzy or nauseous, or had a headache during or after a job? In this blog post, we’ll look at CO and its effects, and consider how the risks can be managed.

How is CO generated?

As we have seen, CO is produced by incomplete combustion of fossil fuels. This generally happens where there is a general lack of maintenance, insufficient air – or the air is of insufficient quality – to allow complete combustion.

For example, the efficient combustion of natural gas generates carbon dioxide and water vapour. But if there is inadequate air where that combustion takes place, or if the air used for combustion becomes vitiated, combustion fails and produces soot and CO. If there is water vapour in the atmosphere, this can reduce the oxygen level still further and speed up CO production.

What are the dangers of CO?

Normally, the human body uses haemoglobin to transport oxygen via the bloodstream. However, it is easier for the haemoglobin to absorb and circulate CO than oxygen. Consequently, when there is CO around, danger arises because the body’s haemoglobin ‘prefers’ CO over oxygen. When the haemoglobin absorbs CO in this way, it becomes saturated with CO, which is promptly and efficiently transported to all parts of the body in the form of carboxyhaemoglobin.

This can cause a range of physical problems, depending on how much CO is in the air. For example:

200 parts per million (ppm) can cause headache in 2–3 hours.
400 ppm can cause headache and nausea in 1–2 hours, life threatening within 3 hours.
800 ppm can cause seizures, severe headaches and vomiting in under an hour, unconsciousness within 2 hours.
1,500 ppm can cause dizziness, nausea, and unconsciousness in under 20 minutes; death within 1 hour.
6,400 ppm can cause unconsciousness after two to three breaths; death within 15 minutes.

Why are HVAC workers at risk?

Some of the most common events in HVAC settings may lead to CO exposure, for example:

Working in confined spaces, such as basements or lofts.
Working on heating appliances that are malfunctioning, in a poor state of repair, and/or have broken or worn seals; blocked, cracked or collapsed flues and chimneys; allowing products of combustion to enter the working area.
Working on open-flued appliances, especially if the flue is spilling, ventilation is poor and/or the chimney is blocked.
Working on flue-less gas fires and/or cookers, especially where the room volume is of inadequate size and/or the ventilation is otherwise poor.

How much is too much?

The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) publishes a list of workplace exposure limits for many toxic substances, including CO. You can download the latest version free of charge from their website at www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/books/eh40.htm but at time of writing (November 2021) the limits for CO are:

Workplace Exposure Limit

Gas Formula CAS Number Long Term Exposure Limit
(8-hr TWA Reference Period)
Short Term Exposure Limit
(15-min Reference period)
Carbon monoxide CO 630-08-0 20ppm (parts per million) 100ppm (parts per million)

How can I stay safe and prove compliance?

The best way to protect yourself from the hazards of CO is be wearing a high quality, portable CO gas detector. Crowcon’s Clip for CO is a lightweight 93g personal gas detector that sounds at 90db alarm whenever the wearing is being exposed to 30 and 100 ppm CO. The Clip CO is a disposable portable gas detector that has a 2-year lifespan or a maximum of 2900 alarm minutes; whichever is sooner.