Why enter into an apprenticeship at Crowcon?

“Working at Crowcon provides me with all the necessary skills required to become a competent engineer within the industry.” Noah Fisher

Apprenticeships are more than just a qualification. They allow you to become a professional in your chosen trade area, earning a wage whilst making a real impact in the business.

Whilst building your engineering career through an apprenticeship scheme at Crowcon, you’ll get experience in a work environment day-to-day in parallel with also gaining the benefits from experienced colleagues and mentors who can help you build your skills and take them straight into the workplace.

Key benefits to an apprenticeship:

 

  • Learn and earn money at the same time
  • Gain a nationally recognised qualification
  • Get relevant and practical experiences
  • Have full support, guidance and training
  • Broaden your knowledge and skillset
  • Network and collaborate with colleagues
  • Future career prospects

There is great scope to earn good rates of pay working as an engineer – across a variety of specialisms as your career develops.

Hear what some of our current apprentices have to say:

“For anyone looking to start an apprenticeship I would say go for it, as it has been a great experience for me because you get to carry out practical activities on site at Crowcon and the theory side at college on a day release type format. This is vital as it gives me the knowledge behind carrying out certain activities and it all links together with my everyday work.” Ryan Jones

 

“For someone who was interested in technology and how things work in different industries, it was inevitable that engineering would be sector in which I chose to pursue a career. However, I am also a person who wouldn’t prefer to be learning in a classroom every day. Therefore, apprenticeships allow you to work in real world environments giving the options to gain the essential experience needed for future careers choices.

Working for an established company like Crowcon provided a clear training programme, both in and out of the workplace that would provide me with the skills and knowledge to progress further within the engineering industry. Given the support provided by the company I have been able to push myself in the classroom to achieve the very best. This was reflected in being awarded a variety of accolades on both local and national levels during my time here at Crowcon.”  Vikesh Patel

We’re always looking at recruiting apprentices and graduate engineers to support in achieving recognised qualifications from NVQs at Level 2 to BTECs, HNC and in some disciplines, such as finance or purchasing, post graduate or professional certificates.

Home grown talent will be the differentiator of the future. The cost of higher education is making many re-think the automatic study routes. It is no longer necessary to become burdened with a large debt, via full time study, to achieve your potential in the work place. Vocational career paths are finally becoming more widely available, with a multitude of opportunities and development routes.

People Development is at the heart of our business success and working collaboratively to release the wider potential within our business is how Crowcon will continue to go from strength to strength.

Following a successful completion of the 3 year apprenticeship, you could follow a similar path to previous apprenticeships with scope to move into an engineering role after a few years in the Line Technician position. Previous apprentices have taken roles in Test & Verification, Quality Engineering, and Manufacturing Engineering.

After all, why would you take a job, when you can have a career?

Working together for safety at sea

Crowcon Detection Instruments is working together with Solent University’s Warsash School of Maritime Science and Engineering – all in the name of teaching engineering cadets, senior Merchant Navy officers, and Superyacht crews.

Solent delivers world-renowned yacht and powerboat design degree programmes, a suite of international maritime studies courses and a wide range of specialist support services for the maritime industry. It is also conducting a large number of research studies that make a real impact on industry thought leadership.

Their partnership with Crowcon makes good sense!  The marine environment is a dangerous one – and not just the more obvious hazards like high seas, storms, or rocks and coral reefs.  Confined spaces on ships, high-risk cargo, and on-ship processes all present potential gas hazards.

To keep mariners safe, gas monitoring equipment is essential.  Gas detection equipment requires specific marine environment testing and certification to ensure suitability to the extreme environments it operates in.  The European Marine Equipment Directive (MED) approval is internationally recognised. Gas detectors used by mariners onboard a vessel registered in an EU country must hold MED approval, and show the wheel mark to demonstrate compliance.

Crowcon has provided the university with demonstration T4 portable multi gas detectors.  T4 provides effective protection against the four most common gas hazards experienced in the marine industry, and is robust and tough enough to deal with the demanding marine environments.  T4 is ideally suited to help vessels comply with multiple SOLAS requirements which dictate the need for gas detection onboard vessels.

John Gouch, lecturer at  Solent University, said: “I have used Crowcon instruments in industry for many years, and know how reliable and trustworthy their gas detectors are. Since joining Warsash 18 months ago, I have been keen to ensure students understand the important part gas detection plays within the on-board safety system.”

“By using demo units of these detectors within our marine engineering courses, we can show the importance of gas detection in a marine environment to hundreds of seafarers and mariners, keeping as many people as possible aware and safe.”

Louise Early, Head of Marketing at Crowcon, said: “We’re really pleased with our partnership with Solent University.  By developing our relationship with training establishments, our safety message gets out to the people who will benefit most. We are always keen to learn from industry and this programme also offers Crowcon further insight into the way in which our equipment is used.”

For more information, visit the Solent University website, or the marine section of our industries page.

Pellistor sensors – all you need to know

We’ve written about pellistor sensors before, but the information still remains vital and useful.  Here’s all you need to know…

Pellistor sensors (or catalytic bead sensors) have been the primary technology for detecting flammable gases since the ‘60s. Despite having discussed a number of issues relating to the detection of flammable gases and VOC, we have not yet looked at how pellistors work. To make up for this, we are including a video explanation, which we hope you will download and use as part of any training you are conducting:

A pellistor is based on a Wheatstone bridge circuit, and includes two “beads”, both of which encase platinum coils.  One of the beads (the ‘active’ bead) is treated with a catalyst, which lowers the temperature at which the gas around it ignites. This bead becomes hot from the combustion, resulting in a temperature difference between this active and the other ‘reference’ bead.  This causes a difference in resistance, which is measured; the amount of gas present is directly proportional to it, so gas concentration as a percentage of its lower explosive limit (%LEL*) can be accurately determined.

The hot bead and electrical circuitry are contained in flameproof sensor housing, behind the sintered metal flame arrestor (or sinter) through which the gas passes. Confined within this sensor housing, which maintains an internal temperature of 500°C, controlled combustion can occur, isolated from the outside environment. In high gas concentrations, the combustion process can be incomplete, resulting in a layer of soot on the active bead. This will partially or completely impair performance. Care needs to be taken in environments where gas levels over 70% LEL may be encountered.

For more information about sensor technology for flammable gases, read our comparison article on pellistors vs Infrared sensor technology: Are silicone implants degrading your gas detection?.

*Lower Explosive Limit – Learn more

 Click in the top right hand corner of the video to access a downloadable file.

Tori’s time at Crowcon

We introduced Tori, the Halma Graduate working with our marketing team, in a previous post.

After completing projects in operations at Diba Industries Inc. in Danbury, CT, USA, and product management at FFE Ltd. in Hitchin, UK, Tori chose to come to Crowcon for her marketing placement. Below, Tori describes why she made that choice and the experiences she has had while working here.

Continue reading “Tori’s time at Crowcon”

‘World of Work’ 2016

The first week of July 2016 was work experience week for many students across Oxfordshire and also coincided with Science week. We took the opportunity to show students what opportunities are available to them if they study Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) subjects at school.

Continue reading “‘World of Work’ 2016”

Deadly Sin No.5 – introducing other hazards

Introducing other hazards is the fifth in Crowcon’s series of Deadly Sins of Gas Detection. Most working environments where gas detection is required are already hazardous enough. The irony of using a gas detector that ends up being the cause of non-gas-related accident would not be an amusing one. Improvements in a variety of gas detection technologies mean that now this can often be avoided. Continue reading “Deadly Sin No.5 – introducing other hazards”

Crowcon Apprentice wins Student of the Year 2016

Last night, at an awards ceremony hosted by Abingdon and Witney College to celebrate student success, one of our second year Engineering Apprentices, Vikesh Patel, won not just ‘2016 Apprentice of the Year’ but, out of around 14000 students across 2 campuses, won ‘2016 Student of the Year’ too. This makes him the first ever apprentice to win such an accolade. Continue reading “Crowcon Apprentice wins Student of the Year 2016”

Deadly sin no.3- using the wrong equipment

 “Using the wrong equipment” is the third of Crowcon’s Deadly Sins of Gas Detection. The best of gas detection intentions can be undermined by use of the detection equipment not up to the job. There are many ways in which the accuracy and safety of gas detection equipment can be inadvertently compromised but there are some errors which can be easily avoided. To illustrate the point, here are some examples:

Continue reading “Deadly sin no.3- using the wrong equipment”

The don’ts and don’ts of zeroing your CO2 detector

Unlike other toxic gases, carbon dioxide (CO2) is all around us, albeit at levels too low to cause health issues under normal circumstances. It raises the question, how do you zero a CO2 gas detector in an atmosphere where CO2 is present?

Continue reading “The don’ts and don’ts of zeroing your CO2 detector”

Life Offshore

Many of you may have wondered what life is really like offshore? To fly in a helicopter to work in the middle of the sea? To work 12-hour shifts for 14 days straight, surrounded by dangerous equipment and hazardous materials?

Continue reading “Life Offshore”