The Benefits of ‘Hot Swappable’ Sensors

What are ‘Hot Swappable’ Sensors?

Hot swappable sensors allow for the replacement or addition of components to a device without the need for stopping, shutting down or rebooting the production process, thus allowing for high productivity and efficiency.

Other benefits of ‘Hot swappable’ sensors

Another benefit is that it eliminates the need for hot work permits. Hot work is regularly undertaken during construction and maintenance projects and is a high-risk activity that requires careful and active risk management. These environments pose a significant risk of fire as well as safety. Hot swappable sensors are designed to avoid these potential problems entirely.

Why are they important?

Some gas detection products are designed to go into zoned areas where there can be flammable (explosive) gas present. Therefore, in environments such as a refinery, if you were to disconnect normal electronics, it usually would cause a small spark, and this is a risk as it could potentially lead to a fire or explosion. However, if the electronics have been designed so there is not a spark and have been approved as “not capable of causing an spark” by the certifying authority, these products can be disconnected and reconnected even in an explosive atmosphere without fear of sparking, ensuring that those working in these environments are kept safe.

It is possible to calibrate hot swappable sensors outside a zoned area and thus allow a rapid swapping exercise instead of a far longer calibration process. Thus, the operator need spend only a fraction of the time in the zoned area substantially avoiding personal risk.

Products with ‘Hot Swappable’ Sensors

XgardIQ is a fixed detector and transmitter compatible with Crowcon’s full range of sensor technologies. Available fitted with a variety of sensors for fixed flammable, toxic, oxygen or H2S gas detection. Providing analogue 4-20mA and RS-485 Modbus signals as standard, XgardIQ is optionally available with Alarm and Fault relays and HART communications. The 316 stainless steel is available with three M20 or 1/2“NPT cable entries. (SIL-2) Safety integrity level 2 certified fixed detector.

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Flammable gas IR sensors – how they work

Here is our final video in the series illustrating the working of hydrocarbon gas detecting sensors. This time, we show the basic mode of operation of an infrared (IR) sensor for flammable gases.

Infrared emitters within the sensor each generate beams of IR light . Each beam is of equal intensity and is deflected by a mirror within the sensor on to a photo-receiver, which measures the level of IR received. The “measuring” beam, with a frequency of around 3.3μm, is absorbed by hydrocarbon gas molecules, so the beam intensity is reduced . The “reference” beam (around 3.0μm) is not absorbed, so arrives at the receiver at full strength. The %LEL of gas present is determined by the difference in intensity between the beams measured by the photo-receiver.

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Are Silicone Implants Degrading your Gas Detection?

In gas detection terms, pellistors have been the primary technology for detecting flammable gases since the 60s.  In most circumstances, with correct maintenance, pellistors are a reliable, cost-effective means of monitoring for combustible levels of flammable gases.  However, there circumstances under which this technology may not be the best choice, and infrared (IR) technology should be considered instead.

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Hydrogen Sulphide: toxic and deadly – Chris explains more about this dangerous gas

Many of you will have come across hydrogen sulphide (H2S). If you have ever cracked a rotten egg the distinctive smell is H2S.

H2S is a hazardous gas that is found in many work environments, and even at low concentrations it is toxic. It can be a product of man-made process or a by-product of natural decomposition. From offshore oil production to sewerage works, petrochemical plants to farms and fishing vessels, H2S presents a real hazard to workers.

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