Connected safety – More than Smart PPE 

Until quite recently, gas detection was widely considered to be ‘just another aspect of personal protection equipment (PPE)’, with gas detectors being fairly basic pieces of kit that detected gas hazards and nothing more. That attitude has been reinforced over years by the fact that gas detectors can be quite cumbersome things; they need bump testing and regular maintenance in order to work, which makes them something of a weak link in an increasingly digitalised, remotely-monitored, connected world. But is that attitude still fair? 

Well, no. Because just as just as every device and system  from washing machines and fridges to supply chains and enterprise equipment management – has joined the internet of things (IoT), so has gas detection. Now, just as your wearable fitness tracker can monitor your health status, and the impact of variables in your environment (exercise, food, temperature, sleep etc.), your gas monitor can connect to the web and feed data into software to generate insights that go far beyond, ‘have I been exposed to a gas hazard today?’ Becoming part of the IoT is transforming gas detection; and that transformation has only just begun. 

Where are we now with connected safety in gas detection? 

As things stand, gas detectors are increasingly connected to cloud-based software. This is often provided on a software-as-a-service (SaaS) basis by the device manufacturer, either on their own infrastructure or via a third party cloud provider. It may take the form of an app that is accessed through a web browser. The software interacts with each gas monitor in a fleet, recognising each one individually and logging data throughout each device’s operation.  

Of course, the primary purpose of gas detectors remains the safety and protection of personnel, but IoT connectivity offers many additional benefits. The scope of each software package may vary according to the provider, but good quality gas detection SaaS should provide: 

  • Remote monitoring of multiple aspects of the device (e.g., has the alarm sounded, and if so, why? When is the device due for calibration? Does it have any faults?)  
  • The ability to connect the device to the wearer (for example through RFID tags in ID badges) so that any failure to comply with proper use that is detected through the software can then be associated with a specific user. In the same way, consistent correct use is also registered. This makes it  much easier to tackle problems with non-compliance and to prove compliance at audit. 
  • The use of software to automatically upload data to the cloud also eliminates the risk of human error and greatly reduces the need for (often tedious and time-consuming) manual documentation. 
  • Above all, adding gas detectors to the IoT in this way generates lots of useful data and, importantly, presents that data in ways that make it genuinely useful. Some applications can also format and populate reports, invoices and other documentation, which can then be accessed from any mobile device with an internet connection, regardless of location.  

What can SaaS/IoT connectivity do for my fleet? 

The short answer is ‘lots’. Some examples are: 

  • Cloud software and monitoring can make it easier to locate workers and devices. This keeps workers safe and reduces device loss or theft. 
  • In today’s digital environment, the data generated by SaaS services is like gold dust: users can see at a glance which devices need to be calibrated or serviced, where they are and who has them. This information can be combined with schedules to plan service and maintenance in ways that reduce downtime and increase productivity. 
  • In a similar way, data insights can be used to identify hazardous areas (for example, repeated alarms may signal a leak) which can then be tackled proactively. 

Of course, gas detection is just at the beginning of its IoT journey: the future may hold anything from smaller wearable devices to on-site IoT drones and more. But even at this early stage, the benefits of using cloud software are clear. Click here to read more about Crowcon’s own solution.

What is Purge Testing and when should I be doing it?

Purge testing is vital when installing, replacing or maintaining a natural gas pipeline or storage tank, or filling new pipework with flammable gas. This process uses an inert gas to clear the enclosed environment of flammable gases prior to air being introduced thereby preventing air and flammable gas mixing. Such mixtures could of course lead to explosive combustion.

What is Purge Testing? 

Purge testing is a key part of the process of making a working environment safe prior to entering it to carry out work. Analysis of the atmosphere in the pipe or enclosure shows the starting point – usually 100% flammable gas. Purge testing is the measurement and reporting of the atmosphere as an inert gas is introduced. As the flammable gas declines to a safe level well below concentrations that would be dangerous in air, the atmosphere is continually analysed, and the flammable gas concentration reported. Once a low concentration has been achieved, air may be introduced. During this phase the flammable gas concentration is analysed to check it remains low, and oxygen concentration is measured to indicate when the atmosphere becomes breathable. Work may then commence – all the while protected by the measurement of flammable gas and oxygen concentration. If, as is likely, the purge testing is being carried out via suction of atmosphere through a sample tube, then this sample tube must at all times and all along its length be held above the flash point of the flammable gas in the tank. This is vital to both your safety and the safety of those working with you.  

Purging removes or displaces hazardous gases from the tank or pipework to prevent them from mixing with the air you need to introduce into the tank to carry out the inspection or maintenance task. The most used and preferred purge gas is Nitrogen, due to its inert properties. After conducting the inspection or maintenance task the reverse process is carried out, reintroducing the inert gas and reducing the oxygen level to near zero prior to allowing natural gas to re-enter. Often a service valve on the line with a standpipe or diffuser attached is cracked to release the venting gas or nitrogen. Purging systems are generally designed to redirect additional gases away from the work area preventing them from remixing with the gas within the tank or pipework. 

Why Conventional Gas Detection isn’t enough 

Traditional gas detection systems are not designed to work in oxygen-deprived environments. This is because they are primarily designed as safety equipment with the specific purpose to detect small traces of target gases in otherwise normal breathable environments. Gas detection equipment designed for use in purge testing activities must be able to function in low oxygen environments and with all contaminants likely to be found in tanks and pipes being purge tested. If sensors can be poisoned by the contaminants present or if there isn’t enough oxygen in the air to enable the selected sensor technology to be used, it may lead to the sensors on the device producing inaccurate results, posing a threat to those working within that environment. An additional point to note to note is that certain gas combinations, concentrations and corrosive liquids may damage the gas detection equipment, rendering it useless. For these reasons, Infrared technology or thermal conductivity is usually chosen as the measurement technology of choice for purge tests. Crowcon uses infrared technology in these applications. A fortunate by-product of that design decision is better accuracy than required over the full sensing range. 

More about Purge testing 

Purge Testing is essential for workers as some may be breathing in toxic gases without even realising it if the sensors on their detection equipment have become defective, don’t measure the required gas type or don’t measure over the required gas range, or environmental range present. Toxic or asphyxiant gas exposure can lead to respiratory issues, significant injury, even death. 

Workers cannot merely rely on a standard confined space gas detection instrument to adequately test for safe conditions during this process, as the high gas level may overwhelm or damage an LEL (Lower Explosive Limit) sensor depending upon type. Or the sensor may not function in an oxygen-depleted atmosphere leading to an unreported dangerous condition. 

What products do we offer? 

Our Gas-Pro TK is a specialised tank monitor that is perfect for customers who want to purge, free, or maintain storage and transportation tanks due to its integrated auto switching dual range IR sensor technology. Other sensors in the product, for example the H2S (Hydrogen Sulphide) sensor option cover other potential risks if gases vent during purging. 

The Future of Connected Safety

Connected safety is becoming a popular phrase in health and safety settings generally, and gas detection in particular. That’s a good thing – because it’s no overstatement to describe connected safety as an evolutionary step in gas monitoring and protection, and it’s a field that is developing all the time.

In this post we’ll establish exactly what connected safety means for anyone monitoring gas hazards, and find out why it pays to take note of developments in this area.

What is Connected Safety?

In gas monitoring terms, connected safety refers to using the internet of things (IoT) to connect gas detection devices (for example, portable gas monitors) to software that pulls the gas exposure information and other data stored on the detector (the identity of the user for any given session, the extent to which the device was used correctly, etc.), analyses it and presents it in useful forms.

By wirelessly connecting each gas monitor – and the data it collects during each work session – to a specialist software package, you can spot patterns of gas exposure, patterns of use and misuse of detectors and automatically store all of the information you need to quickly prove regulatory and legal compliance.

When this information is scaled up across entire device fleets, naturally the data it produces also scales up and can be aggregated. And if that data is acted upon, it can improve safety across your business and drive better, more informed decisions.

That is, in a nutshell, how our Crowcon Connect solution works.

How does Crowcon Connect work for Connected Safety?

Crowcon Connect is Crowcon’s own software, which works with all current (manufactured from 2004 onwards) and future Crowcon portable gas detectors. Because we own and develop the software, we are constantly upgrading it in light of customer feedback and can make customised versions where required (although it’s also really easy for users to configure the standard dashboard to suit their own needs).

Quick User Assignment easily links devices, events and people

For each work session, anyone who needs a portable detector simply scans in their ID (for example, their work ID badge) and is allocated a device. If they don’t like that device (for example, if it’s not suitable for the job in hand) they can simply re-scan their badge to be assigned another detector.

When the user returns the detector to its dock at the end of the work session, the dock transfers the data to the Crowcon Connect portal while simultaneously un-allocating the device, ready for the next user.

The data transferred to the portal includes details of the user and the device, exposure and alarm information and a full range of gas data. Once that data reaches the portal, Crowcon Connect can crunch the numbers and work its magic.

Connected Safety streamlines processes, improves outcomes

The Crowcon Connect user interface is very intuitive and easy to customise, which means every user can see precisely the information that matters to them, whenever and wherever they need it.

For example, it becomes very straightforward to prove regulatory compliance when real-time data is available, and easy to spot potentially dangerous areas when alarm data begins to cluster. Mundane tasks – such as flagging those detectors that are due for calibration and/or maintenance – can be automated, which saves time and reduces the risk of human error.

Of course you can also aggregate fleet-wide, site-wide and/or team-wide data, which lets you to spot patterns (for example, of exposure events or device losses) and make relevant changes. This helps you to improve your site and workforce safety, and you can always locate detectors (and any workers attached to them) in real time.

Is Connected Safety the way of the future?

In a word, yes. We live in a data-driven world and the use of information is driving improvements in all sectors, gas detection included. Our increasing (and increasingly widespread) reliance on technology is only going to amplify that.

After all, data can do much to offset the shortcomings of human management. Data is objective, not driven by assumptions or bias, and gives an honest reflection of what is actually happening in the field, rather than what is intended to happen. If you’ve ever worn a fitness tracker for a while, you’ll get this idea!

However, data analytics are only useful if they are based on top quality, current information – and that’s where connected safety comes in. Connected safety applications collect information accurately and in real time. If you manage gas monitoring, with data straight from the device you will be operating on the basis of objective, trustworthy information. What is more, you can use that information to make people safer – and even save lives.

We’ll be sharing some more posts about connected safety in the coming weeks, so please come back to this page for those. In the meantime, why not have a look at our white paper on connected safety for more detailed information, or check out our Crowcon Connect pages?

Keeping the Emergency Services Safe

Emergency Service Personnel encounter gas related risks as part of their jobs. However, immediate evaluation of their surrounds is key upon arrival as well as continuous monitoring whilst in a rescue situation are vital for the health of all those involved.  

What Gases are Present?

Toxic gases like carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen cyanide (HCN) are present if there is a fire. Individually these gases are dangerous and even deadly, the two combined is exponentially worse, known as the toxic twins.  

Carbon monoxide (CO) is a colourless, odourless, tasteless, poisonous gas produced by incomplete burning of carbon-based fuels, including gas, oil, wood, and coal. It is only when fuel does not burn fully that excess CO is produced, which is poisonous. When the excess CO enters the body, it stops the blood from bringing oxygen to cells, tissues, and organs. CO is poisonous as you cannot see it, taste it or smell it but CO can kill quickly without warning.  

Hydrogen Cyanide (HCN) is an important industrial chemical and over a million tonnes are produced globally each year. Hydrogen Cyanide (HCN) is a colourless or light blue liquid or gas that is extremely flammable. It has a faint bitter almond odour, although this isn’t detectable to everyone.  There are many uses for hydrogen cyanide, primarily in the manufacture of paints, plastics, synthetic fibres (for example nylon) and other chemicals. Hydrogen cyanide and other cyanide compounds have also been used as a fumigant to control pests. With other uses being in metal cleaning, gardening, ore-extraction, electroplating, dying, printing and photography. Sodium and potassium cyanide and other cyanide salts may be made from hydrogen cyanide. 

What are the risks?

These gases are dangerous individually. However, exposure to both combined is even more dangerous, so an adequate CO and HCN gas detector is essential where the toxic twins are found. Usually, visible smoke is a good guide, however the Toxic Twins are both colourless.  Combined these gases are usually found in fires. in which, Firefighters and other Emergency Personnel are trained to look out for CO poisoning in fires. However, due to the increased use of plastics and man-made fibres, HCN can be released at up to 200ppm in domestic and industrial fires. These two gases cause thousands of fire related deaths annually, so needs more consideration in fire gas detection.  

The attendance of HCN in the environment may not always lead to exposure. However, for HCN to cause any adverse health effects, you need to come into contact with it, i.e., breathing, eating, drinking, or through skin or eye contact with it. Following exposure to any chemical, the adverse health effects are dependent on a number of factors, such as the amount to which you are exposed (dose), the way you are exposed, the duration of exposure, the form of the chemical and if you were exposed to any other chemicals. As HCN is very toxic, it can prevent the body from using oxygen properly. Early signs of exposure to HCN include headache, sickness, dizziness, confusion and even drowsiness. Substantial exposure may rapidly lead to unconsciousness, fitting, coma and possibly death. If a substantial exposure is survived, there may be long-term effects from damage to the brain and other nervous system damage. Effects from skin contact require a large surface of the skin in order to be exposed. 

What Products are Available?

For Emergency Service Teams, the use of portable gas detectors is essential. Toxic gases are produced when materials are burnt meaning flammable gases and vapours may be present.  

Our Gas-Pro portable multi gas detector offers detection of up to 5 gases in a compact and rugged solution. It has an easy-to-read top mount display making it easy to use and optimal for confined space gas detection. An optional internal pump, activated with the flow plate, takes the pain out of pre-entry testing and allows Gas-Pro to be worn either in pumped or diffusion modes. In-field pellistor changes for methane, hydrogen, propane, ethane, acetylene (0–100% LEL, with resolution of 1% LEL). By allowing in-field pellistor changes, Gas-Pro detectors give users the flexibility to conveniently test for a range of flammable gases, without needing multiple sensors or detectors. What is more, they can continue to calibrate using existing methane canisters, saving time and money. The gas sensor for hydrogen cyanide has a monitoring measuring range of 0–30 ppm with resolution of 0.1 ppm.  

Tetra 3 portable multi gas monitor can detect and monitor the four most common gases (carbon monoxide, methane, oxygen and hydrogen sulphide), but also an expanded range: ammonia, ozone, sulphur dioxide, H2 filtered CO (for steel plants) and IR carbon dioxide (for safe area use only). 

T4 portable 4-in-1 gas detector provides effective protection against 4 common gas hazards: carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulphide, flammable gases and oxygen depletion. The T4 multi gas detector now comes with improved detection of pentane, hexane and other long chain hydrocarbons. 

Clip Single Gas Detector (SDG) is an industrial gas detector designed for use in hazardous areas and offers reliable and durable fixed life span monitoring in a compact, lightweight and maintenance-free package. Clip SGD has a 2-year life and is available for hydrogen sulphide (H2S), carbon monoxide (CO) or oxygen (O2). 

Gasman is a full function device in a compact and lightweight package – perfect for customers who need more sensor options, TWA and data capability. It comes available with long-life O2 sensor, MPS sensor technology.

MPS Sensor provides advanced technology that removes the need to calibrate and provides a ‘True LEL’ for reading for fifteen flammable gases but can detect all flammable gases in a multi-species environment. Many industries and applications use or have as a by product multiple gases within the same environment. This can be challenging for traditional sensor technology which can detect only a single gas that they were calibrated for and can result in inaccurate reading and even false alarms which can halt process or production. The challenges faced in multi gas species environments can be frustrating and counterproductive. Our MPS™ sensor can accurately detect multiple gases at once and instantly identify gas type. Our MPS™ sensor has a on board environmental compensation and does not require a correctional factor. Inaccurate readings and false alarms are a thing of the past.

Crowcon Connect is a gas safety and compliance insight solution that utilises a flexible cloud data service offering actionable insight from detector fleet. This cloud-based software provides a top level view of device utilisation with dashboard showing proportion of devices that are Assigned or Unassigned to an operator, for the specific region or area selected. Fleet Insights provides overview of devices switch on/off, synced or in alarm.

Why HVAC professionals are at risk from Carbon Monoxide – and how to manage it

Carbon Monoxide (CO) is an odourless, colourless and tasteless gas that is also highly toxic and potentially flammable (at higher levels: 10.9% Volume or 109,000ppm). It is produced by the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels such as wood, oil, coal, paraffin, LPG, petrol and natural gas. Many HVAC systems and units burn fossil fuels, so it’s not hard to see why HVAC professionals may be exposed to CO in their work. Perhaps you have, in the past, felt dizzy or nauseous, or had a headache during or after a job? In this blog post, we’ll look at CO and its effects, and consider how the risks can be managed.

How is CO generated?

As we have seen, CO is produced by incomplete combustion of fossil fuels. This generally happens where there is a general lack of maintenance, insufficient air – or the air is of insufficient quality – to allow complete combustion.

For example, the efficient combustion of natural gas generates carbon dioxide and water vapour. But if there is inadequate air where that combustion takes place, or if the air used for combustion becomes vitiated, combustion fails and produces soot and CO. If there is water vapour in the atmosphere, this can reduce the oxygen level still further and speed up CO production.

What are the dangers of CO?

Normally, the human body uses haemoglobin to transport oxygen via the bloodstream. However, it is easier for the haemoglobin to absorb and circulate CO than oxygen. Consequently, when there is CO around, danger arises because the body’s haemoglobin ‘prefers’ CO over oxygen. When the haemoglobin absorbs CO in this way, it becomes saturated with CO, which is promptly and efficiently transported to all parts of the body in the form of carboxyhaemoglobin.

This can cause a range of physical problems, depending on how much CO is in the air. For example:

200 parts per million (ppm) can cause headache in 2–3 hours.
400 ppm can cause headache and nausea in 1–2 hours, life threatening within 3 hours.
800 ppm can cause seizures, severe headaches and vomiting in under an hour, unconsciousness within 2 hours.
1,500 ppm can cause dizziness, nausea, and unconsciousness in under 20 minutes; death within 1 hour.
6,400 ppm can cause unconsciousness after two to three breaths; death within 15 minutes.

Why are HVAC workers at risk?

Some of the most common events in HVAC settings may lead to CO exposure, for example:

Working in confined spaces, such as basements or lofts.
Working on heating appliances that are malfunctioning, in a poor state of repair, and/or have broken or worn seals; blocked, cracked or collapsed flues and chimneys; allowing products of combustion to enter the working area.
Working on open-flued appliances, especially if the flue is spilling, ventilation is poor and/or the chimney is blocked.
Working on flue-less gas fires and/or cookers, especially where the room volume is of inadequate size and/or the ventilation is otherwise poor.

How much is too much?

The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) publishes a list of workplace exposure limits for many toxic substances, including CO. You can download the latest version free of charge from their website at www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/books/eh40.htm but at time of writing (November 2021) the limits for CO are:

Workplace Exposure Limit

Gas Formula CAS Number Long Term Exposure Limit
(8-hr TWA Reference Period)
Short Term Exposure Limit
(15-min Reference period)
Carbon monoxide CO 630-08-0 20ppm (parts per million) 100ppm (parts per million)

How can I stay safe and prove compliance?

The best way to protect yourself from the hazards of CO is be wearing a high quality, portable CO gas detector. Crowcon’s Clip for CO is a lightweight 93g personal gas detector that sounds at 90db alarm whenever the wearing is being exposed to 30 and 100 ppm CO. The Clip CO is a disposable portable gas detector that has a 2-year lifespan or a maximum of 2900 alarm minutes; whichever is sooner.

What are Area Monitors and how do I use one?

Outdoor leaks from storage tanks or pipelines are a particular kind of hazard. With many outdoor areas not housing permanent, fixed detectors. If you’re relying solely on a personal monitor, by the time it alarms, there is a possibility that you may be engulfed in a hazardous gas cloud. Therefore, a temporary early warning system between you and the potential source of a gas hazard has the ability to alert you to trouble coming your way.

What are Area monitors and where would they be used? 

Temporary Area monitors are usually rugged units that can be placed, stand-alone to monitor a small area or multiple units can be linked together via wired or wireless networking to create a perimeter defence of a larger area. Area Monitor devices help safety personnel protect their workers from gas hazards in situations, in addition to—or sometimes in substitution of—personal, portable gas monitors used as Personal Protective Equipment (PPE). Area monitors can be positioned to produce a guard between potential hazards and workers, to notify what they are heading into or what potential hazards are coming their way.  This occurs most often when work takes place outside of normal operations where the risks are higher and/or different such as special projects, construction, maintenance, shutdowns, temporary sites or rigs, etc. In this way, they can be used to form a barrier around a tank or along a portion of pipeline close to the location of work being carried out. Portable units can be easily deployed to provide fence line monitoring during maintenance, shutdowns or turnaround. The objective is to ensure that the devices are not so far apart that gas could pass between them undetected.  If a fixed system is being taken offline for maintenance a network of fast to deploy temporary area monitors is an ideal option to use in place of the fixed system until maintenance is complete and the system is brought back online. 

How do you use one? 

Units can be connected by cables. However wireless connection between individual area monitors is also available and avoids introducing a potential trip hazard. This could add significantly to an already risky task, for example, if working at height. Some wireless systems create a “self-healing” mesh network. In this case, should the wireless connection between two devices weaken, the network will automatically re-route communications via alternate enabled devices, creating a mesh type network allowing a more robust and efficient wireless network. 

The benefit from a wireless connection is that it is practical to use repeaters or extra units to relay alerts directly to the control room. Besides the gas alert signals, some detectors will transmit other faults i.e., the loss of signal, or “battery low” alarm. This programmed alert mode is often conveyed by a specific sequence of signals, such as the beacon and lights will flash for 3 seconds followed by 5 second pause which will be repeated until an operator acknowledges the alarm. 

Wireless temporary area monitoring allows for quick deployment whilst ensuring a high level of protection for workers in circumstances where the risks are tricky to monitor. Personnel working at height can be alerted to any gas hazards on the ground, or vice versa and the same alarm can be relayed to the control room by having an additional detector in the control room. The audible alarm is significantly louder than a standard portable and light sequence is brighter and flashes faster on the Detective+ unit when gas is detected. , whilst the sequence on other units in the network is slower. This differentiates the unit nearest the gas from the rest, so everyone is alerted to the location of the hazard. In contrary, to the benefits of this products, the configuration tends to be straightforward without additional hardware. The batteries in Detective+ are larger and last longer than conventional portables. All in all, these units offer a simple yet effective solution for protecting workers outside of normal operations. 

Crowcon’s Detective+ is ideal for temporary area monitoring while workers carry out a repair. Detective+ is portable and can be easily deployed to provide fence line monitoring during shutdowns or turnaround. If working on a cooling tower fin fan, Detective+ units are connected to other units (up to 70m away) via Detective Wireless modules, which eliminate the need for cabling between units. Detective Wireless uses the proven RICOCHET mesh network. In the unusual circumstance that the wireless connection between two devices weaken, the network will automatically re-route communications via alternate RICOCHET enabled devices and so ‘self-heal’. In essence, this creates a mesh type network allowing a more robust and efficient wireless network.

Read more about Area Monitoring  

An ingenious solution to the problem of high temperature H2S

Due to extreme heat in the Middle East climbing up to 50°C in the height of summer, the necessity for reliable gas detection is critical. In this blog, we’re focusing on the requirement for detection of hydrogen sulphide (H2S)- a long running challenge for the Middle East’s gas detection industry.

By combining a new trick with old technology, we’ve got the answer to reliable gas detection for environments in the harsh Middle Eastern climate. Our new High Temperature (HT) H2S sensor for XgardIQ has been revisited and improved by our team of Crowcon experts by using a combination of two ingenious adaptations to its original design.

In traditional H2S sensors, detection is based on electrochemical technology, where electrodes are used to detect changes induced in an electrolyte by the presence of the target gas. However, high temperatures combined with low humidity causes the electrolyte to dry out, impairing sensor performance so that the sensor has to be replaced regularly; meaning high replacement costs, time and efforts.

Making the new sensor so advanced from its predecessor is its ability to retain the moisture levels within the sensor, preventing evaporation even in high temperature climates. The updated sensor is based on electrolytic gel, adapted to make it more hygroscopic and avoiding dehydration for longer.

As well as this, the pore in the sensor housing has been reduced, limiting the moisture from escaping. This chart indicated weight loss which is indicative of moisture loss. When stored at 55°C or 65°C for a year just 3% of weight is lost. Another typical sensor would lose 50% of its weight in 100 days in the same conditions.

For optimal leak detection, our remarkable new sensor also features an optional remote sensor housing, while the transmitter’s displays screen and push-button controls are positioned for safe and easy access for operators up to 15metres away.

 

The results of our new HT H2S sensor for XgardIQ speak for themselves, with an operating environment of up to 70°C at 0-95%rh, as well featuring a 0-200ppm and T90 response time of less than 30 seconds. Unlike other sensors for detecting H2S, it offers a life expectancy of over 24 months, even in tough climates like the Middle East.

The answer to the Middle East’s gas detection challenges fall in the hands of our new sensor, providing its users with cost-effective and reliable performance.

Click here for more information about the Crowcon HT H2S sensor.

Chernobyl – a powerful safety message to the world

The recent Sky Atlantic TV series Chernobyl sent out a powerful message about the catastrophic and far reaching consequences of radiation gases, both to people and the environment.

The series is based on true events from the 1986 nuclear disaster in the then USSR; the largest uncontrolled radioactive release into the environment ever recorded. The accident resulted in an untold number of fatalities, as well as serious social and economic disruption for large populations within the USSR and beyond.

The Chernobyl explosion resulted in a radioactive gas cloud which travelled across Europe, including the UK; falling to the ground in the form of ‘nuclear rain’.

There are many disturbing facts we read about. Not least that according to the British Ministry of Health, 369 farms and 190,000 sheep in Britain still contain traces of radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl disaster.

Both human and mechanical error contributed to the disaster and thankfully safety standards, regulations, awareness and new technologies have significantly improved since the disaster.

The principal of safety, whether a huge nuclear facility or small manufacturing plant, must remain the same. Here at Crowcon we are dedicated to keeping people and the environment protected. Our technologies support organisations across multiple industries, including nuclear plants, improving plant and personal safety. Our technologies help our customers be protected from the dangers of gases.

At Crowcon, we welcome shows such as Chernobyl which document historical disasters such as this and highlight in a dramatic but real way, the importance of ensuring companies understand the need for safety measures, however big or small, are in place.  Protecting their people, the environment and the world.

#DetectingGasSavingLives

#SaferCleanerHealthier

Servicing for safety… A visit to the oil refinery

Working in the office makes it easy to focus on the individual tasks and get detached from how our products are making a difference to people’s lives. One of our customers was kind enough to facilitate an onsite visit so that Andrea (our Halma Future Leader on a marketing placement) could see first-hand how our products are used and who the end users are. This meant a visit to an oil refinery to see where our Crowcon portable gas detectors are used.


“The main thing that surprised me was the sheer size of the site. The oil refinery was very spaced out and it took us 10 minutes to walk from the entrance of the site to where the Crowcon engineer’s based. The engineers and employees around different parts of the refinery wore Hi Vis jackets, big safety boots, hard hats and all appeared to have personal gas detectors. During a quick site tour, I learned the products of the oil refinery are not limited to gas or petrol, but also tar, asphalt, lubricants, washing up liquid, paraffin wax and much more.

The products are all stored in big containers with pipes all over the site. Most of the products are highly flammable which explains the big focus on safety. In the distance, there were a few dome shaped containers which are pressurised vessels. If one of them were to explode, it would have a 10 mile blast radius. Suddenly I had the urge to leave and drive about 10 miles.

Crowcon’s engineer base was full of orange T4s, Gas-Pros as well as an army of “Daleks”, I mean Detectives, awaiting calibration and service. While the harshness of this industrial environment was evident from their appearance, they were otherwise in good working order, and the service engineer worked through the devices quickly.

The end users think of them as a simple device they have to wear to do their job, and they like the simplicity and reliability of Crowcon devices. The Detectives get thrown around and Gas-Pros are almost black is comparison to the usual orange, which just showcases how important the robustness of our devices is. The dangers of this working environment are not generally a big concern to the users, this is everyday life to them. Our devices help ensure they go home after a tough shift. Ensuring the devices are functioning properly is down to the service engineers, and they need to think for the users to ensure that the devices are being used properly.

Seeing Crowcon’s devices being used and the number of times someone enquired if the devices are calibrated and ready to go back into action, highlighted just how important use of portables as part of the safety regime  is considered. “Quality” and “robust” is how users describe Crowcon products and even though they may now treat them like the life saving devices they are, the devices are regularly used and valued. They make a very flammable and dangerous environment a safer place to be.”

Complacency – the biggest sin of all

We recently ran a series of articles under the guise of the Seven Deadly Sins of Gas Detection, which talked about gas detection and common mistakes of different kinds that could cost you your life or someone else’s life. However, the real deadly sin that sits at the root of all is complacency – not taking gases and gas hazards as a serious and present danger.

Continue reading “Complacency – the biggest sin of all”