Understanding Air Pollutants: A Guide to Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs)

What are Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs)

‘Volatile organic compounds and ‘VOCs’, like particulate matter, does not refer to one specific substance. VOCs are a group of substances that display similar chemical properties, emitted from a variety of solids and liquids. VOC concentrations tend to be higher indoors (up to ten times higher) than outdoors, but are of concern wherever they are emitted due to their potential to have negative impacts on health.

Sources

VOCs are emitted by a wide array of products, from household products, to paints, varnishes and wax which all contain organic solvents, and many cleaning, disinfecting, cosmetic, degreasing and hobby materials. VOCs are often harder to trace than other forms of air pollutants because they may not have an odour, and can come from so many different sources.

Building materials utilised in the construction sector are known to emit VOCs. Wood panels and a range of building materials give off these toxic compounds which remain in the air as pollution. Commonly harmful substances emitted in the building sector include formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, phenol, glycol ethers and methylene chloride. These sources tend to be categorised within solid building materials and liquid building materials.

Environmental Impact

VOCs can react with nitrogen oxides (NOx) to form ground level ozone, which directly contributes to climate change and global warming and can cause slowed growth rate in plants, trees and crops as well as other significant impacts on ecosystems and wildlife.

Health Impact

The health impact of volatile organic compounds are specifically concerning because they tend to be chronically, rather than acutely, toxic and so their effects can be hidden until some time after exposure. A particularly damaging VOC is benzene, with adverse health effects including anaemia and leukaemia. It is commonly found in the manufacture of many man-made compounds, like some rubbers, dyes and detergents and is therefore even more hazardous because of its regular usage.

The effects of most low-level VOC exposure are frequently not felt for many months or years. Exposure through inhalation poses the most risk, as the vapour is able to pass through the thin membrane of the lungs directly into the bloodstream. The results can range from irritation of the respiratory tract to damage of the nervous system and cancer.

Long-term neurological symptoms from exposure to VOCs can include impaired memory, reaction times, balance and hand-eye coordination, mood disorders (presenting as depression, irritability, and fatigue) can also be common.

Sensit by Crowcon SPOD

The Sensit by Crowcon SPOD emissions monitor offers real-time continuous monitoring and direct-reading, without laboratory analysis, at a lower cost than traditional methods. The SPOD platform combines wind and air pollutant concentration measurements to detect VOC emission plumes and help locate the source of emissions. By receiving accurate VOC emissions data, users are equipped with the information to take necessary action to reduce their impact. The product also allows for real-time continuous monitoring, and features solar charging and global cellular integration for remote operation.

Gold Mining: What gas detection do I need? 

How is gold mined?

Gold is a rare substance equating to 3 parts per billion of the earth’s outer layer, with most of the world’s available gold coming from Australia. Gold, like iron, copper and lead, is a metal. There are two primary forms of gold mining, including open-cut and underground mining. Open mining involves earth-moving equipment to remove waste rock from the ore body above, and then mining is conducted from the remaining substance. This process requires waste and ore to be struck at high volumes to break the waste and ore into sizes suitable for handling and transportation to both waste dumps and ore crushers. The other form of gold mining is the more traditional underground mining method. This is where vertical shafts and spiral tunnels transport workers and equipment into and out of the mine, providing ventilation and hauling the waste rock and ore to the surface.

Gas detection in mining

When relating to gas detection, the process of health and safety within mines has developed considerably over the past century, from morphing from the crude usage of methane wick wall testing, singing canaries and flame safety to modern-day gas detection technologies and processes as we know them. Ensuring the correct type of detection equipment is utilised, whether fixed or portable, before entering these spaces. Proper equipment utilisation will ensure gas levels are accurately monitored, and workers are alerted to dangerous concentrations within the atmosphere at the earliest opportunity.

What are the gas hazards and what are the dangers?

The dangers those working within the mining industry face several potential occupational hazards and diseases, and the possibility of fatal injury. Therefore, understanding the environments and hazards, they may be exposed to is important.

Oxygen (O2)

Oxygen (O2), usually present in the air at 20.9%, is essential to human life. There are three main reasons why oxygen poses a threat to workers within the mining industry. These include oxygen deficiencies or enrichment, as too little oxygen can prevent the human body from functioning leading to the worker losing consciousness. Unless the oxygen level can be restored to an average level, the worker is at risk of potential death. An atmosphere is deficient when the concentration of O2 is less than 19.5%. Consequently, an environment with too much oxygen is equally dangerous as this constitutes a greatly increased risk of fire and explosion. This is considered when the concentration level of O2 is over 23.5%

Carbon Monoxide (CO)

In some cases, high concentrations of Carbon Monoxide (CO) may be present. Environments that this may occur include a house fire, therefore the fire service are at risk of CO poisoning. In this environment there can be as much as 12.5% CO in the air which when the carbon monoxide rises to the ceiling with other combustion products and when the concentration hits 12.5% by volume this will only lead to one thing, called a flashover. This is when the whole lot ignites as a fuel. Apart from items falling on the fire service, this is one of the most extreme dangers they face when working inside a burning building. Due to the characteristics of CO being so hard to identify, I.e., colourless, odourless, tasteless, poisonous gas, it may take time for you to realise that you have CO poisoning. The effects of CO can be dangerous, this is because CO prevents the blood system from effectively carrying oxygen around the body, specifically to vital organs such as the heart and brain. High doses of CO, therefore, can cause death from asphyxiation or lack of oxygen to the brain. According to statistics from the Department of Health, the most common indication of CO poisoning is that of a headache with 90% of patients reporting this as a symptom, with 50% reporting nausea and vomiting, as well as vertigo. With confusion/changes in consciousness, and weakness accounting for 30% and 20% of reports.

Hydrogen sulphide (H2S)

Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is a colourless, flammable gas with a characteristic odour of rotten eggs. Skin and eye contact may occur. However, the nervous system and cardiovascular system are most affected by hydrogen sulphide, which can lead to a range of symptoms. Single exposures to high concentrations may rapidly cause breathing difficulties and death.

Sulphur dioxide (SO2)

Sulphur dioxide (SO2) can cause several harmful effects on the respiratory systems, in particular the lung. It can also cause skin irritation. Skin contact with (SO2) causes stinging pain, redness of the skin and blisters. Skin contact with compressed gas or liquid can cause frostbite. Eye contact causes watering eyes and, in severe cases, blindness can occur.

Methane (CH4)

Methane (CH4) is a colourless, highly flammable gas with a primary component being that of natural gas. High levels of (CH4) can reduce the amount of oxygen breathed from the air, which can result in mood changes, slurred speech, vision problems, memory loss, nausea, vomiting, facial flushing and headache. In severe cases, there may be changes in breathing and heart rate, balance problems, numbness, and unconsciousness. Although, if exposure is for a longer period, it can result in fatality.

Hydrogen (H2)

Hydrogen Gas is a colourless, odourless, and tasteless gas which is lighter than air. As it is lighter than air this means it float higher than our atmosphere, meaning it is not naturally found, but instead must be created. Hydrogen poses a fire or explosion risk as well as an inhalation risk. High concentrations of this gas can cause an oxygen-deficient environment. Individuals breathing such an atmosphere may experience symptoms which include headaches, ringing in ears, dizziness, drowsiness, unconsciousness, nausea, vomiting and depression of all the senses

Ammonia (NH3)

Ammonia (NH3) is one of the most widely used chemicals globally that is produced both in the human body and in nature. Although it is naturally created (NH3) is corrosive which poses a serve concern for health. High exposure within the air can result in immediate burning to the eyes, nose, throat and respiratory tract. Serve cases can result in blindness.

Other gas risks

Whilst Hydrogen Cyanide (HCN) doesn’t persist within the environment, improper storage, handling and waste management can pose severe risk to human health as well as effects on the environment. Cyanide interferes with human respiration at cellular levels that can cause serve and acute effects, including rapid breathing, tremors, asphyxiation.

Diesel particulate exposure can occur in underground mines as a result of diesel-powered mobile equipment used for drilling and haulage. Although control measures include the use of low sulphur diesel fuel, engine maintenance and ventilation, health implication includes excess risk of lung cancer.

Products that can help to protect yourself

Crowcon provide a range of gas detection including both portable and fixed products all of which are suitable for gas detection within the mining industry.

To find out more visit our industry page here.

Oxford becomes first UK city to implement a ‘Zero Emissions Zone (ZEZ)’

As part of its air quality plan, the UK government has identified ‘Low Emissions Zones (LEZs)’ as a way for local authorities to reduce air pollution in specific areas. The London LEZ, introduced in 2008, was the first of its kind in the UK. Fourteen years later, many more cities across the UK have implemented LEZs and ‘Clean Air Zones’ to combat emissions, including Glasgow, Birmingham and Bath.

Whilst many cities are now operating low emissions zones, in February 2022, Oxford became the first UK city to implement a ‘Zero Emissions Zone (ZEZs)’. In the new ZEZ, only vehicles which do not emit any harmful pollutants can enter without incurring charges. All petrol and diesel vehicles, including hybrids, will incur a daily charge unless eligible for a discount or exemption.

The idea of a zero-emissions zone for Oxford was first identified in 2015 as part of the Oxfordshire Local Transport Plan. Following extensive consultations and revised proposals in the following seven years, the pilot phase of the ZEZ started on 28th February this year.

Emissions from vehicles are currently one of Oxford’s most significant air pollution causes, accounting for 17 per cent of greenhouse gas emissions in the city. Steps that have already been taken to combat this include a LEZ for buses introduced in 2014, and it is hoped that the new ZEZ and its future expansion will further reduce air pollution levels. Not just limited to Oxford, vehicle emissions are a major nationwide issue, responsible for 33% of the emissions of nitrogen oxides in the UK in 2019.

The current ZEZ consists of a small area right in the heart of Oxford city centre, with this small pilot designed to allow the local authorities to gain useful insights and test how the scheme works before expanding the area covered by the ZEZ.

The second phase of the ZEZ is planned to be implemented next year and will cover the majority of Oxford city centre. A series of further expansions and increased restrictions are planned to achieve a city-wide ZEZ by 2035.

It is hoped that the zero-emissions zone will encourage road users to switch to low and zero-emissions vehicles and make other positive changes to their travel behaviour.

Campaign manager at Asthma + Lung UK, Tim Dexter, described the implementation of a ZEZ as a “watershed moment for tackling air pollution, setting the level of ambition other local authorities should be aiming for in dealing with the UK’s toxic air crisis”.

Sensit by Crowcon RAMP and SPOD

The Sensit by Crowcon RAMP provides a solution for monitoring up to five gaseous pollutants and particulate matter in a robust, remote, and reliable way. For monitoring volatile organic compounds (VOCs), the SPOD is a solution that is optimised for real-time direct reading for localised emissions. Both devices can provide meaningful data on pollution levels and aid in identifying ‘pollution hotspots’ being caused by vehicle emissions, allowing the correct measures to be taken based on facts and data.

To find out more, visit https://www.crowcon.com/air-quality/

Our Partnership with Altitude Safety

Background

Altitude Safety has developed into one of the UK’s leading Confined Space and Site Safety Equipment suppliers. Supplying a product portfolio of over 10,000 products from the leading global manufacturers and with their dedicated fleet, Altitude Safety can deliver your safety solutions nationwide. Altitude Safety is part of the Citrus Group and has a client base of more than 35,000, thereby offering truly extensive and multifaceted provision. The Group aims to keep focused on Safety Equipment, Education and Training whilst also providing an effective and complete safety and training solution trusted by industries worldwide.

Views on Gas Detection

Providing both portable and fixed systems allows Altitude Safety’s customers to have a full solution option best suited to their needs and requirements. In regard to portable gas detection being a critical piece of safety equipment, Altitude Safety put customers at the forefront of gas detection, providing equipment in gas detection that not only protects their customers plants and processes but, more importantly, helps to prevent injury, thereby helping to ensure the health, safety, and wellbeing of its workers. Also, with the supply of fixed gas detection, Altitude Safety can offer its customers a complete turnkey solution for both new and replacement systems. Altitude Safety ensures the customers’ requirements through complete site surveys to provide advice on the best location of sensor heads, cable runs, and control panels. Whilst also offering a complete service from supply, installation, commissioning, and ongoing service/calibration contracts.

Maintaining and servicing safety products is key to ensuring that it remains in tip-top condition and ultimately works correctly at the critical time. Their manufacture approved service centre is operated via a team of dedicated and manufacturer-trained technicians. From receipt into our warehouse, Altitude Safety prides itself in being meticulously careful with the products ensuring that they are maintained, serviced and packaged correctly, ready for their customers to get back to operating as soon as possible.

Working with Crowcon

Through continuous communication of knowledge and expertise with Altitude Safety, our partnership has allowed for the supply of gas detection instruments for those working in the confined space and utility industries. “Our partnership with Crowcon has allowed us to provide a full turnkey solution for our customers and qualified service centres. We can provide a critical safety product to a range of industries, environments and workers to ensure safety for those involved”.

Where do Flue Gas Analysers Fit into the UK Government’s Decarbonisation Plans?

When the UK government announced, in March 2021, that £1 billion of already-allocated funds would be redirected to projects designed to reduce greenhouse gases, the energy sector sat up and listened. And with good reason – as it turned out, £171 million will be allocated to an industrial decarbonisation plan that focuses on hydrogen gas generation and carbon capture and storage technologies.  

However, the news extended beyond green energy production and is relevant to domestic and industrial HVAC applications. In a gesture that reflects the role HVAC engineers and manufacturers can play in sustainability, more than £900 million will be spent upgrading public buildings, like schools and hospitals, with greener fittings such as heat pumps, solar panels and insulation, which will reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions.

But where does this leave the individual households and business units that many HVAC staff visit daily? That is a question that several commentators have asked, and it seems that – for now at least – the main drive to reduce the environmental impact of privately-owned heating and plumbing systems will continue to come from the manufacturers, engineers and installers working in the HVAC sector. 

And that’s quite a responsibility. According to the Office for National Statistics, in 2020, there were approximately 27.8 million households in the UK; government statistics from 2019 indicate that around 15% of greenhouse gas emissions in the UK (specifically of carbon dioxide, along with methane, F gases and nitrous oxide) came from those residential settings. That’s a lot of excess CO2 to clean up. 

So, what can HVAC people do to help decarbonisation? 

If they have decent equipment, heating engineers and plumbers can help to reduce that figure by 15%. For example, they are well placed to measure CO2 and other greenhouse gases: while most flue gas analysers will measure CO2, some can also measure NO/NOx (for example, the Sprint Pro 5 and Sprint Pro 6) well.  

A flue gas analyser that gives a wide range of easy-to-read and interprets measurements allows engineers to see when appliances are not working correctly and whether an upgrade (for example, to a government-subsidised heat pump) might be in order. 

This is a pressing need: many households hang onto appliances for as long as possible, even though older appliances tend to be much less environmentally friendly than their modern counterparts. This is bad enough for the environment, but using a malfunctioning older appliance is the worst of all possible outcomes. 

A good flue gas analyser will provide the readings required to convince many customers to decarbonise their homes or businesses more effectively. It will also allow the engineer to fix many problems in more modern and efficient appliances, bringing them back to their original operating standards and protecting the planet once more. 

Helping to reach net zero 

In late 2021, the UK government set out its plan to reach net-zero emissions by 2050 and every heating engineer in the country has a part to play in that project. While checking flue gases may be an everyday event for many HVAC engineers, the fact remains that household and business emissions account for a substantial proportion of CO2 output and emissions of other dangerous gases. While persuading a single household to operate with lower carbon emissions may not seem like a big deal, the impact can be very substantial when this is scaled up across the country. 

Understanding Air Pollutants: A Guide to Carbon Monoxide (CO)

What is Carbon Monoxide (CO)

Carbon monoxide (CO) is an odourless, colourless, and tasteless but dangerous gas that primarily contributes to air pollution. The gas is made up of carbon and oxygen and is highly toxic, capable of causing acute illness and death in the most severe cases.

Sources

Carbon Monoxide (CO) is formed when materials don’t burn completely; this can occur with the burning of fossil fuels like natural gas, petrol, coal and oil, wood smoke, from car and truck exhausts, as well as through faulty gas heaters, BBQs, ovens, and cooktops.

Carbon monoxide is a significant element of exhaust fumes from road vehicles. These emissions are a source of CO and industrial processes such as petroleum refining, oil and gas extraction, and chemical production.

Common outdoor objects using hydrocarbons as a fuel can also be a source of CO emissions, including some power tools, lawnmowers, generators and open fires.

In the working environment, machinery such as propane-powered forklifts, pressure washers and gas-powered concrete cutters can contribute to the build-up of carbon monoxide in the atmosphere.

Environmental Impact

CO is itself a greenhouse gas. When CO is emitted into the atmosphere, it adds to the amount of greenhouse gases generated, which directly impacts global warming and climate change. As it is a relatively unreactive compound, it does not pose a significant threat to plant life. However, it can be quite harmful to oxygen transport systems in humans and other animals.

Health Impact

If inhaled, CO attaches to the haemoglobin in red blood cells, which generally carry oxygen throughout the body. When CO attaches, it “uses up” the oxygen-carrying capacity of the red blood cell and thus blocks the transport of oxygen the body needs, ultimately causing a wide range of health problems.

Inhaling low levels of carbon monoxide can lead to symptoms including nausea, confusion and disorientation, dizziness and headaches. Regularly breathing at low levels can lead to permanent mental or physical problems.

Very high levels of CO can lead to more severe consequences, including unconsciousness and death. There are around 60 deaths from accidental carbon monoxide poisoning in England and Wales each year. Whilst extreme levels of CO are uncommon outdoors; there is a particular concern for people with pre-existing conditions where the heart needs more oxygen than usual when outdoor levels of carbon monoxide are elevated. The greatest risks are indoors or within tents where CO from burning hydrocarbons can build up.

Sensit by Crowcon RAMP

The Sensit RAMP is a robust, remote and reliable low-cost air quality monitoring platform. The device is capable of monitoring up to five gaseous chemical pollutants including carbon monoxide. The device uses a laser scattering detection method to detect both PM2.5 and PM10 with a range of 1-1000 μg/m3.

The RAMP is suitable for use in a variety of industries including construction, transport, waste, oil and gas, chemical and petrochemical industries.

Our Partnership with Hatech Gasdetectietechniek B.V.

Service providers are vital in supplying products and solution services to customers. However, they also provide customers with a range of knowledge and expertise to ensure they supply their customers with the correct equipment.

Background

Founded in 1994 and located in Raamsdonksveer, North Brabant, Hatech Gasdetectietechniek B.V. are a gas detection specialist. With over 25 years of experience, Hatech is the biggest service provider in the Netherlands, operating as a seven-person organisation and supply gas detection for the office, workshop, factory, plants, offshore, biogas or any other industrial environment. Hatech supply a wide range of gas detection products, from portable devices to complete fixed setups and customised installations. In addition to the supply of gas detection, Hatech is also a ‘one-stop shop’ as they issue calibration, service and supply rental of gas detection equipment.

Views on Gas Detection

Gas detection is a crucial piece of safety equipment for those who work in hazardous environments; therefore, supplying the correct equipment for the job is vital. Hatech ensures they provide the knowledge and understanding to enable their customers to understand and know the equipment they are buying correctly. Hatech issues tailor-made advice that ensures they know what application and who will be entering these environments to ensure that they offer the most suitable solution for your gas detection application.

Working with Crowcon

A 15-year partnership and continued communication have allowed Hatech to supply their customers with a gas detection solution. Although Hatech Gasdetectietechniek is based in the Netherlands, our partnership provides them with a short lead time allowing for a quick turnaround in products. Hatech is an official service centre for portable devices and supplying service engineers for fixed products. “Crowcon detectors are a premier gas detection solution that is simple to operate, with a complete sales and service team. Our partnership has provided our customers with new technology and the knowledge and understanding allowing for the correct equipment for the right application.”

T4x a Compliance 4-gas monitor 

It is vital to ensure that the gas sensor you employ is fully optimised and reliable in the detection and accurate measurement of flammable gas and vapours, whatever environment or workplace it is within, is of the utmost importance. 

Fixed or portable? 

Gas detectors come in a range of different forms, most commonly they are known as fixed, portable or transportable, in which these devices are designed to meet the needs of the user and environment whilst protecting the safety of those within it.  

Fixed detectors are implemented as permanent fixtures within an environment to provide ongoing monitoring of plant and equipment. According to guidance from the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) these types of sensors are particularly helpful where there is the possibility of a leak into an enclosed or partially enclosed space which could lead to the accumulation of flammable gases. The International Gas Carrier Code (IGC Code) states that gas detection equipment should be installed to monitor the integrity of the environment that it is to monitor and should be tested in accordance with the recognised standards. This is to ensure that the fixed gas detection system operates effectively, timely and accurate calibration of the sensors is critical. 

Portable detectors normally come as a small, handheld device that can be used within smaller environments, confined spaces, to trace leaks or early warnings to the presence of flammable gas and vapour within hazardous areas. Transportable detectors are not handheld, but they are easily moved from place to place to act as a monitor ‘stand-in’ whilst a fixed sensor is undergoing maintenance. 

What is a compliance 4-gas monitor? 

Gas sensors are primarily optimised for detecting specific gases or vapours through design or calibration. It is desirable that a toxic gas sensor, for example one detecting carbon monoxide or hydrogen sulphide, provides an accurate indication of the target gas concentration rather than a response to another interfering compound. Personal safety monitors often combine several sensors for protecting the user against specific gas risks. However, a ‘Compliance 4-Gas monitor’ comprises sensors for measuring levels of carbon monoxide (CO) hydrogen sulphide (H2S), oxygen (O2) and flammable gases; normally methane (CH4) in one device.  

The T4x monitor with the ground-breaking MPS™ sensor is able to provide protection from CO, H2S, O2 risks with accurate measurement of multiple flammable gases and vapours utilising a basic methane calibration. 

Is there a need for a compliance 4-gas monitor? 

Many of the flammable gas sensors deployed in conventional monitors are optimized for detecting a specific gas or vapour through calibration but will respond to many other compounds. This is problematic and potentially dangerous as the gas concentration indicated by the sensor will not be accurate and may indicate a higher (or more dangerously) and lower concentration of gas/vapour than is present. With workers often potentially exposed to risks from multiple flammable gases and vapours within their workplace, it is incredibly important to ensure that they are protected through the implementation of an accurate and reliable sensor. 

How is the T4x portable 4-in-1 gas detector different? 

To ensure ongoing reliability and accuracy of the T4x detector. The detector utilises the  MPS™ (Molecular Property Spectrometry) Sensor functionality within its robust unit that provides a range of features to ensure safety. It offers protection against the four common gas hazards: carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulphide, flammable gases and oxygen depletion, whilst The T4x multi gas detector now comes with improved detection of pentane, hexane and other long chain hydrocarbons. It comprises a large single button and easy-to-follow menu system to enable ease of use for those wearing gloves, who’ve undergone minimal training. Tough, yet portable, the T4x detector features an integrated rubber boot and an optional clip-on filter that can be easily removed and replaced when needed. These features allow the sensors to remain protected even within the dirtiest environments, to ensure they can constant. 

A unique benefit to the T4x detector is that it ensures toxic gas exposure is calculated accurately throughout an entire shift, even if it is switched off momentarily, during a break or when travelling to another site. The TWA feature allows for uninterrupted and disrupted monitoring, So, when powering up, the detector begins again from zero, as if starting a new shift and ignores all previous measurements. The T4x allows the user the option to include previous measurements from within the correct time frame. The detector is not just reliable in terms of accurate detection and measurement of four gases, it is also dependable due to its battery life. It lasts for 18 hours and is useful for usage across multiple or longer shifts without requiring charging as regularly.  

During usage the T4 employs a handy ‘traffic light’ display offering constant visual assurance that it is operating soundly and conforming to the site bump test and calibration policy. The bright green and red Positive Safety LEDs are visible to all and, as a result, offer a quick, simple and comprehensive indication of the monitor’s status to both the user and others around them. 

T4x helps operations teams focus on more value adding tasks by reducing the number of sensor replacements by 75% and increasing sensor reliability. Through ensuring compliance across site T4x helps health and safety managers by eliminating the need to ensure each device is calibrated for the relevant flammable gas as it accurately detects 19 at once. Being poison resistant and with battery life doubled, operators are more likely to never be without a device. T4x reduces the 5-year total cost of ownership by over 25% and saves 12g of lead per detector which makes it much easier to recycle at the end of its life. 

Overall, through the combination of three sensors (including two new sensor technologies MPS and Long-life O2) within an already popular portable multi-gas detector. Crowcon allowed for the enhancement of safety, cost-effectiveness and efficiency of individual units and entire fleets. The new T4x offers longer life with a higher accuracy for gas hazard detection whilst providing a more sustainable build than ever before. 

National Mental Health Awareness Week 2022

In the UK we are marking Mental Health Awareness Week as well as the month-long observance in the US, we’re reminded that with society changing at a fast pace new norms arise, such as working from home. Many of us try to adapt to both home and hybrid working while building and maintaining both work and personal connections. However, 1 in 5 people are experiencing loneliness. We all get affected by loneliness at one time or another. It can be a driver for and/or a product of poor mental health. Although Mental health problems can affect anyone, any day of the year, this week aims to promote reaching out to a friend, family member or colleague and reflecting on your own wellbeing too.

At Crowcon, we are focused on looking after our people, and have put in place programmes and resources to help them feel safe, healthy, and fulfilled. This includes our company employee assistance programme, which provides a range of methods of support and advice.

Crowcon is playing a part in providing an environment that supports and nurtures our people. From mental health first aiders to walking challenges, we try to ensure that our people are supported and feel connected where they work.

There are lots of advice and support to help you on your way:

10 practical ways of looking after your mental health

https://www.samaritans.org/

https://unitedgmh.org/

https://www.nhsinform.scot/healthy-living/womens-health/later-years-around-50-years-and-over/menopause-and-post-menopause-health/menopause-and-your-mental-wellbeing/

Our Partnership with Tyco (Johnson Controls)

Background 

Johnson Controls has over 120 years’ experience in providing complete life safety to the oil and gas industries world-wide helping to provide 90% of the world’s top fifty oil and gas companies. Merging with Tyco in 2018 they now provide a full turn-key solution for the global marine and navy industries. The merge has allowed for the protection of over 80% of the vessels at sea for all types of assets and facilities including fixed and portable devices. Johnson Controls also supply gas detection to the renewable industry.

Views on Gas Detection 

Johnson Controls is uniquely positioned to offer comprehensive and integrated solutions for a wide range of proven products and systems across several industries and applications. Johnson Controls have a culture that focuses on innovation and continuous improvement which in turn helps to us to solve current challenges whilst constantly looking to ‘What’s next’. As gas detection is an essential instrument for many workers within the oil and gas and marine industries, providing honestly and transparency is key as well as upholding the highest standards of integrity and honour in the commitments they make, ensure that their customers are given a solution that not only solves their pain but also protects their workers.  

Working with Crowcon 

Through continuous communication, our partnership with Johnson Controls has allowed them to provide honesty and transparency to their customers. This partnership has allowed Johnson Controls to reach a variety of industries and applications. Although previously our partnership has predominately been focused on our portable product range, future hopes will be focussed on our fixed product range, of which will allow Johnson Controls to expand their customer base as well as providing a solution to a wider audience. “Our partnership with Crowcon has allowed us to offer a solution to all customers, ensuring that those who we supply equipment to are protected.”